Media Mentions

New media social networks illustrationNewspaper coversWhether you're old school... 
or hip with new media, the range of outlets to tell your story continues to grow and become more sophisticated. Below, you'll find the latest mentions across all media platforms for newspaper, magazine and digital media articles, news broadcasts, online video interviews, blogs, podcasts and more related to faculty and staff in the University of Arizona Department of Medicine.

For all media mentions for the UArizona Health Sciences colleges and related centers and institutes, see these links:

Media Mentions

Thursday, May 23, 2024

Hormone replacement therapy may benefit some women with pulmonary hypertension
Continuing coverage: The use of hormone replacement therapy may be associated with improved pulmonary hypertension in women, according to research presented at the American Thoracic Society 2024 International Conference by corresponding author Audriana Hurbon, MD, assistant clinical professor in the Department of Medicine's Division of Inpatient Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson.
Managed Healthcare Executive ►►►

Wednesday, May 22, 2024

Hormone replacement therapy may benefit some women with pulmonary hypertension
Continuing coverage: The use of hormone replacement therapy may be associated with improved pulmonary hypertension in women, according to research presented at the American Thoracic Society 2024 International Conference by corresponding author Audriana Hurbon, MD, assistant clinical professor in the Department of Medicine's Division of Inpatient Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson.
West Observer ►►►

Tuesday, May 21, 2024

Hormone replacement therapy may benefit some women with pulmonary hypertension
Continuing coverage: The use of hormone replacement therapy may be associated with improved pulmonary hypertension in women, according to research presented at the American Thoracic Society 2024 International Conference by corresponding author Audriana Hurbon, MD, assistant clinical professor in the Department of Medicine's Division of Inpatient Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson.
MSN ►►►
Globe Echo (UK) ►►►
Respiratory Therapy ►►►

This 1 exercise may reduce your risk of knee pain and arthritis as you age
Ongoing coverage. A new study published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise reveals that people who participated in regular bicycling over their lifetime had a lower prevalence of frequent knee pain, radiographic osteoarthritis (ROA) and symptomatic radiographic osteoarthritis (SOA). C. Kent Kwoh, MD, chief, Division of Rheumatology, and director, University of Arizona Arthritis Center, at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is co-author on study.
AOL ►►►
India Today ►►►

Monday, May 20, 2024

Rubbing Your Eyes Is Way More Harmful Than You Think
While it may be satisfying during allergy season, rubbing your eyes introduces a host of potential issues, and even puts you at risk for vision problems. Worst of all? It probably doesn’t even help with itch. Tara Carr, MD, associate professor and director of the Adult Allergy Program and Allergy & Immunology Fellowship in the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine at the UArizona College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted.
Inverse.com ►►► 
Inkl (Australia) ►►►

Biking over your lifetime is associated with less knee pain or arthritis, study suggests
Ongoing coverage. A new study published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise reveals that people who participated in regular bicycling over their lifetime had a lower prevalence of frequent knee pain, radiographic osteoarthritis (ROA) and symptomatic radiographic osteoarthritis (SOA). C. Kent Kwoh, MD, chief, Division of Rheumatology, and director, University of Arizona Arthritis Center, at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is co-author on study.
NPR ►►►
NBC News ►►►
New York Post ►►►

Longer lifetime menses, hormone replacement therapy linked to improvements in PH
Continuing coverage. The use of hormone replacement therapy may be associated with improved pulmonary hypertension in women, according to research at the American Thoracic Society 2024 International Conference presented by corresponding author Audriana Hurbon, MD, assistant clinical professor in the Department of Medicine's Division of Inpatient Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson.
Healio ►►►
News-Medical.net (UK/Australia) ►►►
Intelligent Living (Tasmania) ►►►
Medical Dialogues (India) ►►►
NewsBeezer (South Africa) ►►►

Sunday, May 19, 2024

Can hormone replacement therapy help treat pulmonary hypertension in women?
About 1% of the global population has pulmonary hypertension, which currently has no cure and is a condition more common in women believed to be due to the hormone estrogen. Researchers from the UArizona College of Medicine Tucson, during a presentation at the American Thoracic Society 2024 International Conference, suggest hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may improve pulmonary hypertension in females. Audriana Hurbon, MD, assistant clinical professor in the Division of Inpatient Medicine, is quoted.
Medical News Today ►►►
Medical Xpress ►►►
AOL ►►► 

Thursday, May 16, 2024

Study: Biking Might Help Prevent Knee Arthritis
Ongoing coverage. A new study published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise reveals that people who participated in regular bicycling over their lifetime had a lower prevalence of frequent knee pain, radiographic osteoarthritis (ROA) and symptomatic radiographic osteoarthritis (SOA). C. Kent Kwoh, MD, chief, Division of Rheumatology, and director, University of Arizona Arthritis Center, at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is co-author on study.
New Telegraph (Nigeria) ►►►

Wednesday, May 15, 2024

4 cardiology leadership appointments in 1 month
Continuing coverage: A recap of cardiology leadership appointments in the past month mentions that the College of Medicine – Tucson has appointed Hesham Sadek, MD, PhD, as the new director of the Sarver Heart Center and chief of the Division of CardiologyRelated content
Becker's ASC Review ►►►

Pedal Power: Biking Could Help Prevent Knee Arthritis
Ongoing coverage. A new study published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise reveals that people who participated in regular bicycling over their lifetime had a lower prevalence of frequent knee pain, radiographic osteoarthritis (ROA) and symptomatic radiographic osteoarthritis (SOA). C. Kent Kwoh, MD, chief, Division of Rheumatology, and director, University of Arizona Arthritis Center, at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is co-author on study.
U.S. News & World Report ►►►
HealthDay ►►►
Drugs.com ►►►
Citizen Tribune (Morristown, TN) ►►►
KPVI-TV (Pocatello, ID) ►►►
Caledonian Record (St. Johnsbury, VT) ►►►
Gwinnett Daily Post (Lawrenceville, GA) ►►►
Tyler Morning Telegraph (Tyler, TX) ►►►
Wyoming Tribune Eagle (Cheyenne, WY) ►►►

Number Of People At Risk From Extreme Heat Will Double By 2050
Ongoing coverage. New research published Tuesday in Nature Communications explains the rising risk due to an aging population worldwide alongside a warming planet Earth. Other climate news is on the hottest summer in the Northern Hemisphere in over 2,000 years and rules for physical education during extreme weather. Cites earlier NPR report that 200 million-plus seniors face extreme heat risks in coming decades, quoting Julia B. Jernberg, MD, MBA, associate professor in the Division of General Internal Medicine, Geriatrics & Palliative Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson
KFF Health News ►►►

Tuesday, May 14, 2024

More than 200 million seniors face extreme heat risks in coming decades, study finds
As people age, their bodies become less adept at handling heat due to physical changes and social or cultural shifts. Julia B. Jernberg, MD, MBA, clinical associate professor in the Division of General Internal Medicine, Geriatrics & Palliative Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted. This article was picked up by nearly all NPR stations, which number more than 1,000.
KJZZ-Radio NPR Phoenix ►►►
Reddit ►►►
Ground News ►►►
EnviroLink (Pittsburgh, PA) ►►►
KOSU-Radio (Stillwater, OK) ►►►
Oregon Public Broadcasting (Portland) ►►►
WLIW-Radio NPR (Long Island, NY) ►►►
Voice of Alexandria NPR (Alexandria, VA) ►►►
WUWM-Radio NPR (Milwaukee, WI) ►►►
WEMU-Radio NPR (Ypsilanti, MI) ►►►
KPCW-Radio NPR (Park City/Heber, UT) ►►►
WCUF-Radio NPR (Tampa, FL) ►►►
KVCR-Radio NPR (San Bernadino, CA) ►►►
WLRN-Radio NPR (Miami-Dade County, FL) ►►►
KASU-Radio NPR (Jonesboro, AR) ►►►
NHPR-Radio NPR (Concord, NH) ►►►
WBOI-Radio NPR (Fort Wayne, IN) ►►►
WUSF Health News Florida (Tampa) ►►►
North County Public Radio (Canton, NY) ►►►
KUOW-Radio NPR (Seattle, WA) ►►►
KGOU-Radio NPR (Oklahoma City, OK) ►►►
Michigan Public Radio (Ann Arbor, MI) ►►►
WAMC Northeast Public Radio (Albany, NY) ►►►
WWNO-Radio NPR (New Orleans, LA) ►►►
WPSU-Radio NPR (State College, PA) ►►►
ipr-Radio NPR (Des Moines, IA) ►►►
South Dakota Public Broadcasting (Rapid City/Sioux Falls, SD) ►►►
upr-Radio NPR (Logan, UT) ►►►
WFAE-Radio NPR (Charlotte, NC) ►►►
WYSO-Radio NPR (Yellow Springs, OH) ►►►
Yellowstone Public Radio (Billings, MT) ►►►
KNKX-Radio NPR (Tacoma, WA) ►►►
WVAS-Radio NPR (Montgomery, AL) ►►►
South Carolina Public Radio (Greenville) ►►►
WRVO-Radio NPR (Oswego, NY) ►►►
WAER-Radio NPR (Syracuse, NY) ►►►
Connecticut Public Radio (Hartford, CT) ►►►

Biking linked to reduced knee pain in later life
Ongoing coverage. C. Kent Kwoh, MD, director of the Arthritis Center and chief of the Division of Rheumatology at the College of Medicine – Tucson’s Department of Medicine, co-authored a study that found people who participated in regular bicycling over their lifetime had a lower prevalence of frequent knee pain, radiographic osteoarthritis and symptomatic radiographic osteoarthritis.
Mirage News (Australia) ►►►
The National Tribune (Australia) ►►►
Patient Daily ►►►

Monday, May 13, 2024

Biking revealed to be associated with less knee pain later in life | BCM
A new study published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise reveals that people who participated in regular bicycling over their lifetime had a lower prevalence of frequent knee pain, radiographic osteoarthritis (ROA) and symptomatic radiographic osteoarthritis (SOA). C. Kent Kwoh, MD, chief, Division of Rheumatology, and director, University of Arizona Arthritis Center, at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is co-author on study.
Baylor College of Medicine ►►►
MedicalXpress ►►►

Wednesday, May 8, 2024

Buckmaster Show: Benefits of a power nap
Victoria Maizes, MD
, professor of medicine and founding executive director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is interviewed about several topics, including the benefits of taking naps.
KVOI-Radio AM1030 Tucson ►►►

Monday, May 6, 2024

New Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine hosts open house
Continuing coverage: The new Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine complex officially opened to the public Saturday, with an open house from noon to 4 p.m. Tours were led by Esther Sternberg, MD, a professor of medicine, center research director and founding director of the Institute on Place, Wellbeing and Performance. Related content.
KOLD-TV Tucson ►►►

Sunday, May 5, 2024

Valley fever disproportionately affects minority populations
Continuing coverage: Experts, including John Galgiani, MD, Division of Infectious Diseases professor and director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the College of Medicine – Tucson, discuss the spread of Valley fever and how people of Hispanic, Native American and African descent are more likely to have severe Valley fever than white people. Related content.
Arizona Daily Star ►►► | PDF

Ulcer-friendly foods and some to avoid
The analysis of foods that can aggravate or soothe ulcers cites advice from Andrew Weil, MD, professor of medicine and founding director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson.
Bottom Line ►►►

Friday, May 3, 2024

Valley fever not just an Arizona phenomenon
Continuing coverage: Experts, including John Galgiani, MD, professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases and director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the College of Medicine – Tucson, discuss the spread of Valley fever. 
Ahwatukee Foothills News, Phoenix ►►►

Impact of climate change topic of UArizona talk
Continuing coverage: Epidemiologist Kacey Ernst, PhD, MPH, at the Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, delivered the keynote address at the UArizona Arthritis Center's annual Living Healthy with Arthritis Symposium on Saturday. A panel discussion on "Climate Change & Health" also included Division of Rheumatology chief and Arthritis Center director C. Kent Kwoh, MDDivision of Infectious Diseases' associate professor and Valley Fever Center for Excellence researcher Fariba Donovan, MD, PhDDivision of General Internal Medicine, Geriatrics & Palliative Medicine's associate professor Julia Jernberg, MD; and professor of medicine and Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine medical director Randy Horwitz, MD, PhDRelated content.
KOLD-TV Tucson ►►►
Arizona Daily Star ►►► | PDF

New Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine hosts open house
Continuing coverage: The new Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine complex officially opens to the public Saturday, with an open house from noon to 4 p.m. Tours will be led by Esther Sternberg, MD, a professor of medicine, center research director and founding director of the Institute on Place, Wellbeing and Performance. Related content.
Tucson Weekly ►►►

Thursday, May 2, 2024

The Rising Star Women of Medicine for 2024
The list of influential women in the medical field includes Elizabeth B. Juneman, MD, interim Sarver Heart Center director, interim chief, Division of Cardiology, and associate professor in the Department of Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson.
The Women We Admire ►►►

Impact of climate change topic of UArizona talk
Continuing coverage: Kacey Ernst, PhD, MPH, professor of epidemiology at the Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, delivered the keynote address at the UArizona Arthritis Center's annual Living Healthy with Arthritis Symposium on Saturday. A panel discussion on "Climate Change & Health" also included Division of Rheumatology chief and Arthritis Center director C. Kent Kwoh, MD; Division of Infectious Diseases' associate professor and Valley Fever Center for Excellence researcher Fariba Donovan, MD, PhD; Division of General Internal Medicine, Geriatrics & Palliative Medicine's associate professor Julia Jernberg, MD; and professor of medicine and Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine medical director Randy Horwitz, MD, PhDRelated content.
KVOA-TV Tucson (via YouTube) ►►►

Wednesday, May 1, 2024

Dr. Hesham Sadek named UArizona cardiology chief
The University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson has appointed Hesham Sadek, MD, PhD, as the new director of the Sarver Heart Center and chief of the Division of Cardiology in the Department of Medicine. Related content.
Becker's ASC ►►►

Open house for the new Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine
The new Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine complex will officially open to the public Saturday, with an open house from noon to 4 p.m. Related content.
Tucson Foodie ►►►

Monday, April 29, 2024

Same stuff, different wrapper: Tobacco is bad regardless of packaging
In an op-ed, the University of Arizona’s Charles C. Hsu, MD, PhD, a Division of Radiation Oncology associate professor, and Alejandro Recio-Boiles, MD, a Division of Hematology & Oncology assistant professor, at the College of Medicine – Tucson, note that All forms of tobacco are bad, but you would not know it by some of the bills introduced in the Arizona Legislature this year. Brian Hummell, Arizona’s government relations director for the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, is a co-author.
Arizona Capitol Times ►►►

Sunday, April 28, 2024

Valley fever hitting minority populations
Continuing coverage. Daniel Sestiaga remembers being in the COVID-19 ward of a hospital in late 2020. He tested positive for the virus that causes COVID-19 in June, then later tested negative, but he was still struggling to breathe and testing positive again by the end of August. It wasn’t only COVID-19 causing his difficulty breathing. He was diagnosed with Valley fever after the X-ray revealed fluid around his lungs restricting their capacity. John Galgiani, MD, a professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases and founding director of the UArizona Valley Fever Center for Excellence, is quoted. 
Times of San Diego ►►►
Arizona Daily Independent Phoenix ►►►

Friday, April 26, 2024

Second annual breast cancer symposium held at the University of Arizona
On April 24, the University of Arizona hosted its second annual Ginny Clements Breast Cancer Research Institute Symposium, with Janet Funk, MD, professor, Division of Endocrinology, and vice chair for research, Department of Medicine, as host for a conversation between Susan G. Komen founder Nancy Brinker and Clements - a philanthropist, breast cancer survivor and patient advocate.
KOLD-TV 13News Tucson ►►►

Valley fever disproportionately affects minority populations
Continuing coverage. Daniel Sestiaga remembers being in the COVID-19 ward of a hospital in late 2020. He tested positive for the virus that causes COVID-19 in June, then later tested negative, but he was still struggling to breathe and testing positive again by the end of August. It wasn’t only COVID-19 causing his difficulty breathing. He was diagnosed with Valley fever after the X-ray revealed fluid around his lungs restricting their capacity. John Galgiani, MD, a professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases and founding director of the UArizona Valley Fever Center for Excellence, is quoted. 
Tucson Sentinel ►►►
MSN ►►►

The osteoarthritis diet
This book excerpt from “The Green Pharmacy Guide to Healing Foods” cites osteoarthritis diet recommendations from Andrew Weil, MD, professor of medicine and founder of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson.
Bottom Line Inc ►►►

Thursday, April 25, 2024

Valley fever, a fungal disease endemic to the Southwest, disproportionately affects minority populations
Experts, including John Galgiani, MD, professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases and director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the College of Medicine – Tucson, discuss the spread of Valley fever and how people of Hispanic, Native American and African descent are more likely to have severe Valley fever than others. Dr. Galgiani's also quoted in a sidebar on Valley fever's history.
Cronkite News (Tucson, AZ) ►►►
Cronkite News (San Joaquin Valley, CA) ►►►

Wednesday, April 24, 2024

Banner Health using new technology to detect Valley fever earlier
With cases expected to rise during Arizona’s dry season, Banner Health is implementing new methods to help detect Valley fever earlier. Banner Urgent Care, including four Tucson clinics, has a new Valley fever dashboard clinicians can use to get ahead of serious cases. The dashboard shows them real-time information about Valley fever activity statewide and prompts them on symptoms that may require testing for the fungal disease caused by inhaling spores found in dry soils of the U.S. Southwest. John Galgiani, MD, a professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases and founding director of the UArizona Valley Fever Center for Excellence, is quoted. Related content.
KTAR-Radio 92.3FM Phoenix ►►►

Tucson philanthropist, founder of Susan G. Komen to bring attention to breast cancer at symposium
Continuing coverage: Susan G. Komen Foundation founder Nancy Brinker delivered the keynote address Wednesday at the 2024 Ginny L. Clements Breast Cancer Research Institute Symposium at the Health Sciences Innovation Building. Janet Funk, MD, professor in the Division of Endocrinology and the Department of Medicine's vice chair for research at the College of Medicine – Tucson, hosted a conversation between Brinker and Clements - a philanthropist, breast cancer survivor and patient advocate. Related content.
KVOA-TV News4 Tucson ►►►

Tuesday, April 23, 2024

Susan G. Komen founder to speak at breast cancer research symposium at UArizona
UArizona President Robert C. Robbins, MD, will deliver opening remarks ahead of a keynote address from Susan G. Komen Foundation founder Nancy Brinker during the 2024 Ginny L. Clements Breast Cancer Research Institute Symposium at the Health Sciences Innovation Building. Janet Funk, MD, professor in the Division of Endocrinology and the Department of Medicine's vice chair for research at the College of Medicine – Tucson, will host a conversation between Brinker and Clements, philanthropist, breast cancer survivor and patient advocate. 
KVOA-TV News4 Tucson ►►►
KOLD-TV News13 Tucson ►►►

Sunday, April 21, 2024

Chopra, Weil headline integrative medicine panel
The UArizona Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine on Tuesday will host a panel discussion focusing on the role of integrative medicine in driving healthcare innovation in the United States with special guests Deepak Chopra and Jon Kabat-Zinn joining Andrew Weil, MD, the center's founding director and a professor of medicine. The event is part of the grand opening of the AWCIM's new building at Drachman Avenue and Vine Road.
KMSB-TV FOX11 Tucson ►►►

New study tackles the noise level in the office
Continuing coverage: A UArizona study on office productivity found a noisy workplace is bad for your health, but so is an extremely quiet one. Report co-author Esther Sternberg, MD, a rheumatologist, professor of medicine and founding director UArizona Institute on Place, Wellbeing & Performance, the research director at the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine and director of the Institute on Place, Wellbeing and Performance, said the optimal noise level in an office comes in at about 50 decibels, comparable to moderate rain or birdsong. Related content.
Dagens PS (Sweden, in Swedish) ►►► | PDF (English)

Wednesday, April 17, 2024

Buckmaster Show: Figuring out what keeps people happy
Victoria Maizes, MD
, professor of medicine and founding executive director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, is interviewed about topics including PFAS chemicals, which can contaminate water and cause health problems.
KVOI-Radio AM1030 Tucson ►►►

3 ways to foster work friendships to energize and reduce stress
Esther Sternberg, MD
, rheumatologist, professor of medicine and research director at the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, writes about ways to start and strengthen friendships with coworkers to help your work experience become more positive and less stressful.
Psychology Today ►►►

Tuesday, April 16, 2024

Diseases in desert dust
Continuing coverage: The danger of fungal infections, which kill an estimated 1.7 million people worldwide per year, is rising due to climate change, population growth and drug resistance. Information from the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the College of Medicine – Tucson, led by John Galgiani, MD, professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases, is cited.
Utah Physicians for Health Environment ►►►

Monday, April 15, 2024

Metformin linked to a lower risk of certain GI cancers, study finds
Diabetes has been linked to an increased risk of several gastrointestinal cancers, including liver, colorectal and pancreatic cancers. A recent systemic review of 166 studies found that metformin was associated with a reduced risk of these three types of cancers among patients with diabetes. Junaid Arshad, MD, assistant professor in the Division of Hematology & Oncology at the College of Medicine – Tucson and member of the UArizona Cancer Center, was not involved in the study but is quoted.
Very Well Health ►►►

Thursday, April 11, 2024

FDA approves AstraZeneca’s Fasenra as add-on maintenance therapy for children aged 6 to 11 with severe asthma
AstraZeneca announced that the FDA has expanded the approval of benralizumab, marketed as Fasenra, to treat severe asthma in children ages 6 to 11 with an eosinophilic phenotype. Eugene R. Bleecker, MD, co-director of the Division of Pharmacogenomics at the UArizona Health Sciences Center for Applied Genetics and Genomic Medicine and professor of medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, was the lead investigator of the Phase III SIROCCO study and is quoted.
PharmExec ►►►

Thursday, April 4, 2024

Enhancing diagnosis and awareness of fungal diseases
Continuing coverage: Experts, including John Galgiani, MD, professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases and director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the College of Medicine – Tucson, discuss the lack of awareness about the spread of Valley fever.
Contagion Live ►►►

Wednesday, April 3, 2024

Soil to lungs: The expanding threat of Valley fever
Experts, including John Galgiani, MD, professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases and director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the College of Medicine – Tucson, discuss Valley fever symptoms and the fungal infection's likeliness to continue spreading.
Contagion Live ►►►

Turmeric: In what situations is it good, according to the experts
Continuing coverage: A new study concludes the spice turmeric – often sold in supplements as curcumin – could be effective at easing arthritis and metabolic syndrome. Janet L. Funk, MD, professor of medicine in Division of Endocrinology and Department of Medicine vice chair fo research at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted.
Newsitamea (Greece, in Greek) ►►►PDF

Tuesday, April 2, 2024

Turmeric: In what cases is it good?
Continuing coverage: A new study concludes the spice turmeric – often sold in supplements as curcumin – could be effective at easing arthritis and metabolic syndrome. Janet L. Funk, MD, a professor in the Division of Endocrinology  and vice chair for research at the Department of Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted.
Cretalive (Greece, in Greek) ►►► | PDF (English)

How office design can improve well-being, productivity
University of Arizona professor of medicine Esther Sternberg, MD, professor of medicine, research director at the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine and director of the Institute on Place, Well-being and Performance, shares her research examining how work environments effect people's health and productivity.
In Session: Leading the Judiciary Podcast, Episode 38 ►►►

Monday, April 1, 2024

2024 New Play Festival features 10 Tucson playwrights, 11 plays
A play written by Melvin G. Hector, MD, a geriatrician and associate clinical professor in the Division of General Internal Medicine, Geriatrics & Palliative Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, will debut April 7 at St. Francis in the Foothills United Methodist Church as part of the Old Pueblo Playwrights' 2024 New Play Festival.
Arizona Daily Star ►►► | PDF

Saturday, March 30, 2024

Do turmeric supplements really treat pain, boost mood, and improve allergies? Experts say they work best for 2 conditions
Continuing coverage: A new study concludes the spice turmeric – often sold in supplements as curcumin – could be effective at easing arthritis and metabolic syndrome. Previous research led by Janet L. Funk, MD, professor in the Division of Endocrinology and vice chair for research at the Department of Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, is cited.
Fortune ►►►
MSN ►►►
Yahoo Finance ►►►

Friday, March 29, 2024

How living in Arizona affects your risk of skin cancer
Lisa Quale
, a senior health educator in the Division of Dermatology and the Skin Cancer Institute at the UArizona Cancer Center, discusses skin cancer risk for those living in Southern Arizona.
KJZZ NPR Radio P​hoenix ►►►

The new etiquette of being sick
Esther Sternberg, MD
, professor of medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson and director of research at the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine, is quoted in a story that says workers do more harm than good when they go to the office sick.
Oprah Daily ►►►
Yahoo Lifestyle ►►►
AOL.com ►►►
MSN ►►►

Monday, March 25, 2024

Valley fever: The deadly and incurable disease terrifying the west coast
Experts, including John Galgiani, MD, professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases and director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the College of Medicine – Tucson, discuss the lack of awareness about the spread of Valley fever.
The Independent (UK) ►►►
Yahoo (UK) ►►►
AOL ►►►
MSN ►►►
NewsExplorer ►►►

Sunday, March 24, 2024

Doctor's 4-7-8 relaxation technique can help you fall asleep in an instant
Continuing coverage: The 4-7-8 Breathing Exercise, developed by Andrew Weil, MD, professor of medicine and founding director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, is designed to help people get to sleep quickly.
Upworthy ►►►

Friday, March 22, 2024

The growing threat of fungal infections
Continuing coverage: The danger of fungal infections, which kill an estimated 1.7 million people worldwide per year, is rising due to climate change, population growth and drug resistance. John Galgiani, MD, professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Department of Medicine and director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted.
KKOH-Radio (Reno, NV) ►►►

Wednesday, March 20, 2024

The growing threat of fungal infections
Continuing coverage: The danger of fungal infections, which kill an estimated 1.7 million people worldwide per year, is rising due to climate change, population growth and drug resistance. John Galgiani, MD, professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases and director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted.
WEPM-Radio (Washington, DC) ►►►
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KRDO-Radio (Colorado Springs, CO) ►►►

Tuesday, March 19, 2024

Reinventing the 6MWT with wearable sensors
Marvin J. Slepian, MD
, Regents Professor of Medicine in the Division of Cardiology at the College of Medicine – Tucson, Sarver Heart Center member and founding director of the Arizona Center for Accelerated Biomedical Innovation, is leading clinical trials to evaluate the effectiveness of a wearable sensor that monitors heart rate and acceleration so investigators can gather more data from each patient during the widely used six-minute walk test.
Clinical Trials (UK) ►►►

Monday, March 18, 2024

Blood test has high accuracy in detecting colon cancer
Continuing coverage: A cell-free DNA blood test designed to detect abnormal DNA signals in people at average risk of colorectal cancer correctly detected colorectal cancer in most people with confirmed disease, according to a new study. Joshua Melson, MD, clinical professor of medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology at the Department of Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson and director of the High-Risk Clinic for Gastrointestinal Cancers at the UArizona Cancer Center, and Gloria Coronado, PhD, associate director of population sciences at the Cancer Center, are quoted.
Germanic (Germany, in German) ►►► | PDF (English)

Saturday, March 16, 2024

Mexico got rid of daylight saving time. Should the US end it, too?
Continuing coverage: Experts, including Sairam Parthasarathy, MD, professor of medicine, chief of the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine and director of the Center for Sleep, Circadian and Neuroscience Research, discuss the pros and cons of following the lead of Mexico and conforming to Arizona and Hawaii practices in eliminating daylight saving time. 
Vintage Dava ►►►

How to use the 4 7 8 sleep method to fall asleep fast and ease nighttime anxiety
Continuing coverage: The 4-7-8 Breathing Exercise, developed by Andrew Weil, MD, professor of medicine in the Department of Medicine and founding director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, is designed to help people get to sleep quickly.
Tom's Networking ►►►
Inkl ►►►
NewsExplorer ►►►
Yahoo Singapore ►►►
The Times (Nigeria) ►►►

Friday, March 15, 2024

DNA Blood Test Has High Accuracy for Detecting Colorectal Cancer
A cell-free DNA blood test designed to detect abnormal DNA signals in people at average risk of colorectal cancer correctly detected colorectal cancer in most people with confirmed disease, according to a new study. Joshua Melson, MD, clinical professor of medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology at the Department of Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson and director of the High-Risk Clinic for Gastrointestinal Cancers at the UArizona Cancer Center, and Gloria Coronado, PhD, associate director of population sciences at the Cancer Center, are quoted.
Medscape ►►►

Thursday, March 14, 2024

The growing threat of fungal infections
The danger of fungal infections, which kill an estimated 1.7 million people worldwide per year, is rising due to climate change, population growth and drug resistance. John Galgiani, MD, professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Department of Medicine and director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted.
ABC News ►►►

Wednesday, March 13, 2024

Exploring non-invasive ways to check for skin cancer
Ongoing coverage: To gain a more complete picture of skin cancer prevalence and address gaps in diagnostic tools, University of Arizona Health Sciences researchers – led by Clara Curiel-Lewandrowski, MD, professor of medicine, co-director of the UArizona Skin Cancer Institute and chief of the Division of Dermatology in the Department of Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson – created the Patient Registry, Imaging Database, and Tissue Bank. It links patient data, images and tissue samples. "PRIT is greater than the sum of its parts," said Nirav Merchant, director of the university's Data Science Institute and interim director of the Center for Biomedical Informatics and Biostatistics. "This allows Dr. Curiel-Lewandrowski’s team, and potentially other researchers, centers and universities, to field a larger body of data sets and make decisions in a consistent and organized manner." Related content.
Photonics Online ►►►

The Daily Agenda: Here we grow!
Continuing coverage: University of Arizona President Robert C. Robbins, MD, announced 16 inaugural members of his new appointed University Advisory Council. "I am particularly encouraged to have students, faculty, staff, department heads and deans working together in the same room to collaboratively address issues," Robbins wrote on Monday. Among council members is Regents Professor Marvin Slepian, MD, in the Department of Medicine's Divison of Cardiology at the College of Medicine - Tucson and a Sarver Heart Center member. This content originated with an email to the campus community. Related content.
Tucson Agenda ►►► | PDF

Tuesday, March 12, 2024

The very best face moisturizers
Experts, including Daniel C. Butler, MD, associate professor of medicine in the Division of Dermatology at the College of Medicine – Tucson and director of the Inflammatory and Aging Skin Research Program, recommend top-performing face moisturizers. In addition, Dr. Butler is featured on the website for one of the products, True Botanicals' Chebula Active Serum, a cream to help renew skin, both in a quote and a commercial that also has aired on Hulu. In the magazine article, he comments on a True Botanical product using fruit extracts of the chebula tree native to South Asia.  
New York Magazine ►►►

Monday, March 11, 2024

Long COVID's long-term effects in Arizona
As part of a national collaborative, University of Arizona researchers have been studying long COVID to better understanding its most common symptoms, since no single test exists for a diagnosis. University of Arizona professor of medicine Sairam Parthasarathy, MD, chief of the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, estimates the long COVID rate among Arizona residents is 3% higher than the national average.
Phoenix Magazine ►►►

Members of new UArizona advisory council announced
UArizona President Robert C. Robbins, MD, announced 16 inaugural members of the University Advisory Council, which includes Lucinda Rankin, PhD, associate professor in the Department of Physiology at the College of Medicine – Tucson, and Marvin J. Slepian, MD, Regents Professor of Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson in the Division of Cardiology. Related content.
KVOA-TV News4 Tucson ►►►

Sunday, March 10, 2024

Mexico got rid of daylight saving time. Should the U.S. end it, too?
Continuing coverage: Experts, including Sairam Parthasarathy, MD, professor of medicine, chief of the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine, and director of the Center for Sleep, Circadian and Neuroscience Research, discuss the pros and cons of following the lead of Mexico and conforming to Arizona and Hawaii practices in eliminating daylight saving time.
SF Gate (San Francisco, CA) ►►►

Friday, March 8, 2024

Don't let Daylight Saving Time ruin your sleep
At 2 a.m., Sunday, most people in the U.S. will "spring" their clocks forward an hour for Daylight Saving Time, potentially losing an hour's sleep in the process. For a less painful transition, University of Arizona associate professor of psychiatry Michael Grandner, PhD, recommends those who observe DST try to get good sleep – seven or more hours at a stretch – for a few nights before the clock change. Meanwhile, Grandner's colleague and director of the UArizona Center for Sleep, Circadian Neuroscience Research, Sairam Parthasarathy, MD, also chair of the College of Medicine – Tucson's Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine division, suggests the U.S. follow Mexico's lead and do away with daylight saving time. "Having that sense of permanence and not flip-flopping is a good thing," said Dr. Parthasarathy, a professor of medicine. "The feeling is (Mexico) got there before we did."
Washington Post ►►► | PDF
New York Times ►►►PDF
Stars and Stripes ►►►
Yahoo! ►►►

Wednesday, March 6, 2024

Buckmaster Show: Concern over lead in drink cups
University of Arizona professor of medicine Victoria Maizes, MD, founding executive director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine, discusses reports that the maker of the ultra-popular Stanley cups uses lead in its manufacturing process.
KVOI-Radio AM1030 Tucson ►►►

Reishi mushroom and others defined as vital: The powerful antioxidant ingredients that protect the skin barrier
Reishi mushrooms, popularized in part by the work of Andrew Weil, MD, professor of medicine and founding director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, can be used to strengthen the body's immune system.
Radio WOW (Italy) ►►► (in Italian) | PDF (English)
Vanity Fair (Italy) ►►► (in Italian)

Tuesday, March 5, 2024

Why do adults wake up earlier as they get older?
As we age, it's normal for sleep patterns to change. Sairam Parthasarathy, MD, a professor of medicine, chief of the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine and director of the Center for Sleep, Circadian & Neuroscience Research, is quoted about the role the aging brain plays in sleep.
Healthy Holistic Living ►►►

Valley fever is on the rise, but it's tricky to diagnose
John Galgiani, MD
, professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases and director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is interviewed about the rise in Valley fever cases, the Valley Fever Center for Excellence's Valley fever dashboard and the importance of early diagnosis. This story also aired on KMSB-TV. Related content.
KOLD-TV Tucson ►►►

Monday, March 4, 2024

Evolving Treatments in Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Updates from ASCO GI 2024
Rachna Shroff, MD, MS, FASCO
, professor and chief of the Division of Hematology & Oncology in the Department of Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, highlights the prominence of the EMERALD-1 study for patients with HCC in this fourth episode underscoring info shared at the ASCO GI 2024 gastrointestinal cancers symposium in San Francisco, Jan. 18-20. Links to episodes 3, 2 and 1 (available since Feb. 26) are available here for the full background. Dr. Shroff also is interim clinical affairs director and associate director of clinical investigations for the UArizona Cancer Center, and the college's associate dean of clinical and translational research.
OncLive ►►►

Thursday, February 29, 2024 

Best advice to prevent dementia and Alzheimer's disease
Good nutrition can help prevent and protect people against forms of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease. Andrew Weil, MD, a professor of medicine and founding director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted.
Prime Women ►►►

Tuesday, February 27, 2024

Tinengotinib shows promise for previously untreated cholangiocarcinoma
Rachna Shroff, MD
, professor and chief of the Division of Hematology and Oncology at the College of Medicine – Tucson and interim clinical affairs director of the UArizona Cancer Center, discussed updated data on tinengotinib, an FGFR inhibitor that has demonstrated notable responses in patients with FGFR-altered cholangiocarcinoma.
Healio ►►►

In your dreams
Experts discuss the purpose and psychological implications of dreams. Rubin Naiman, PhD, clinical assistant professor of medicine at the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, is interviewed. This story has at least 15 pickups.
WFPL-Radio (Louisville, KY) ►►►

Saturday, February 24, 2024

In your dreams
Experts discuss the purpose and psychological implications of dreams. Rubin Naiman, PhD, clinical assistant professor of medicine at the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, is interviewed. This story has at least 15 pickups.
WERN-Radio (Madison, WI) ►►►

Friday, February 23, 2024

‘Disease-in-a-Dish’ and other regenerative medicine technologies for Parkinson’s disease
Lalitha Madhavan, MD, PhD
, associate professor of medicine and neurology at the College of Medicine – Tucson, will speak about modern regenerative medicine technologies Saturday, March 10, 9:45 a.m., at the SaddleBrooke active adult community's DesertView Performing Arts Center, 39900 S. Clubhouse Dr., Tucson.
Saddlebag Notes (Tucson, AZ) ►►►

Monday, February 19, 2024

Concurrent administration of RSV and influenza vaccines appears safe in healthy older adults
University of Arizona professor emeritus Neil M. Ampel, MD, in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Department of Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, reviews results of a randomized, double-blind Australian study that found no difference in efficacy or effects of vaccines for respiratory syncytial virus and influenza whether patients received those doses simultaneously or sequentially.
Medicine Today ►►►

Leading Valley fever expert shares ‘state-of-the-art’ knowledge about fungal disease
John Galgiani, MD
, professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Department of Medicine and director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the College of Medicine – Tucson, co-authored an invited review in the New England Journal of Medicine that focuses on how fungal diseases present in people with healthy immune systems and examines current diagnostics and treatments. Related content.
ReachMD ►►► 
Medical Xpress ►►►
The Microbiologist ►►►

Sarver Heart Center's Day of Giving blood drive
Continuing coverage: As part of its annual Day of Giving, the Sarver Heart Center hosted a blood drive Feb. 14 in the Student Union Memorial Center's Kachina Lounge. All donors received a $20 Amazon gift card from the American Red Cross. Cara Deery, program manager of outreach and education at the Sarver Heart Center, is quoted.
KGUN-TV Tucson ►►►

Thursday, February 15, 2024

Role of circulating tumor DNA in guiding colon cancer treatment: Insights from the CIRCULATE and COBRA studies
Precision medicine has emerged as a critical component in improving cancer patient outcomes. A key area of focus is the use of circulating tumor DNA, a form of liquid biopsy, in guiding therapeutic choices for patients with colon cancer. An ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium presentation by Rachna Shroff, MD, MS, associate dean of clinical and translational research, associate professor and chief of the Division of Hematology and Oncology in the College of Medicine – Tucson and UArizona Cancer Center member, is cited.
Healio ►►►
Medriva (Hong Kong) ►►►

Experts on creating an office paradise say this...
Continuing coverage: Esther Sternberg, MD, professor of medicine and director of research in the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is interviewed about how people can enhance their office environments to improve both their health and professional performance. The story draws on quotes from a previous interview in American Essence Magazine.
Epoch Times Taiwan (Taiwan, in Chinese) ►►►

Wednesday, February 14, 2024

Tucson pilot battles with FAA after grounded for ‘post-COVID neurocognitive deficits’
The Federal Aviation Administration recently grounded Michael Hotto, a private pilot from Tucson due to his history of “post-COVID neurocognitive deficits” after he performed poorly on portions of a cognitive exam. While many people diagnosed with COVID-19 recover within a few days or weeks, others struggle with symptoms that linger for months, or years. Department of Medicine Pulmonary division chief Sairam Parthasarathy, MD, also director of the Center for Sleep, Circadian and Neuroscience Research, is quoted. 
KOLD-TV Tucson ►►►

Sarver Heart Center hosts first-ever blood drive for 'Day of Giving'
Continuing coverage: As part of its annual Day of Giving, the Sarver Heart Center hosted a blood drive Wednesday in the Student Union Memorial Center's Kachina Lounge. All donors received a $20 Amazon gift card from the American Red Cross and had a chance at winning other prizes as well.
KGUN-TV Tucson ►►►
KVOA-TV Tucson ►►►

Friday, February 9, 2024

30 Breaths A Day, 5 Days A Week - Resistance Training Helps Aging Adults Breathe Better
An American professor and his wife pilot a study in Mysore, India, to find out if  inspiratory muscle strength training, or IMST – a breath exercise – can improve breathing capacity in older adults age 65+. Story quotes married couple Karl Krupp, MSc, PhD, and Purnima Madhivanan, MBBS, PhD, MPH, both Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health faculty (Dr. Madhivanan with appointment also in Department of Medicine), on a clinic they started in city as well as establishing Public Health Research Institute of India.
India Currents ►►►

Thursday, February 8, 2024

Denise Austin, 66, shares quick 5-minute workout for heart health
In honor of American Heart Month, fitness expert Denise Austin posted a viral workout on Instagram geared to support circulation. Andrew Weil, MD, a professor of medicine and founding director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted from a previous Prevention story.
Prevention ►►►
Yahoo Lifestyle ►►►
AOL ►►►

Wednesday, February 7, 2024

New findings on vitamin D, omega-3 supplements for preventing autoimmune diseases
Janet L. Funk, MD
, professor of medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, commented on a study that examined whether daily doses of vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acid reduced the risk for autoimmune diseases. She said the results suggested that while each supplement may offer protection against autoimmune diseases, the effects are inconsistent and may not apply to all patients.
Medscape ►►►
Termedia (Poland - in Polish) ►►►

Tuesday, February 6, 2024

13 signs your lungs may not be healthy
Experts discuss signs of symptoms involving your lungs that may signify serious medical issues. Ken Knox, MD, vice dean of academic and faculty affairs at the College of Medicine – Phoenix and a professor of medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson and Phoenix, is quoted.
Parade ►►►
Yahoo Lifestyle ►►►
MSN ►►►
Tyler Morning Telegraph (Tyler, TX) ►►►

Monday, February 5, 2024

'Practice-changing studies' from the 2024 ASCO Gastrointestinal Symposium
In this video, the University of Arizona Cancer Center's Rachna T. Shroff, MD, MS, also chief of the Division of Hematology & Oncology in the Department of Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, discusses highlights from ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium held in San Francisco, Jan. 18-20. Among the highlights were results of the SKYSCRAPER-08 study and MATTERHORN study.
Healio ►►►

Wednesday, January 31, 2024

UArizona officially designated as an age-friendly university
Continuing coverage: UArizona has been named a member of the Age-Friendly University Global Network, a group of higher education institutions committed to promoting positive and healthy aging and enhancing the lives of older members of the global community. Innovations in Health Aging, a UArizona Health Sciences strategic initiative, sponsored the Jan. 20 Aging and the Arts Poetry Circle. Geriatrics and rheumatology programs centered in the Department of Medicine are cited in the designation. Related story.
KGUN9-TV Tucson ►►►

Friday, January 26, 2024

2024 Take a Swing at Cancer Tournament, Feb. 20
The 2024 Take a Swing at Cancer event on Feb. 20 at the Preserve Golf Club will raise funds for the UArizona Cancer Center. Evening events at the Mountain View Ballroom include gift basket raffles, a wine grab and silent auction.
Arizona Daily Star ►►►

Tuesday, January 23, 2024

Weight loss won't ensure diabetes remission over long term, study indicates
People newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes can manage blood glucose levels without medication if they shed pounds and maintain that weight loss. But a new study indicates few patients stay in remission through weight loss alone over the long term. Lawrence J. Mandarino, PhD, chief of the Division of Endocrinology at the College of Medicine – Tucson and director of the Center for Disparities in Diabetes, Obesity & Metabolism, was not involved in the study but is quoted.
United Press International ►►►

Friday, January 19, 2024

'Work trend' in wardrobes of the ages is hot!; office workers love quiet, private spaces
Continuing coverage: A University of Arizona study on office productivity found a noisy workplace is bad for your health, but so is an extremely quiet one. Report co-author Esther Sternberg, MD, a professor of medicine, research director at the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine and director of the Institute on Place, Wellbeing and Performance, said the optimal noise level in an office comes in at about 50 decibels, comparable to moderate rain or birdsong.
Electric City Magazine (Canada) ►►►

Wednesday, January 3, 2024

Doctor's 4-7-8 relaxation technique can help you fall asleep in an instant
Continuing coverage: The 4-7-8 Breathing Exercise, developed by Andrew Weil, MD, professor of medicine and founding director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, is designed to help people get to sleep quickly. 
Upworthy ►►► 

Tuesday, January 2, 2024

Pill problems: Aging drivers need to re-think med choices
Over-the-counter medications can have adverse effects on older adults, including driving impairment. A tool called the Beers Criteria, which is a list of medications potentially inappropriate for people 65 and older, helps providers recommend safe doses for older adults. Jeannie Lee, PharmD, associate professor in the R. Ken Coit College of Pharmacy and a member of the UArizona Center on Aging co-led by Mindy Fain, MD, is quoted.
Green Valley News ►►►

Monday, January 1, 2024

Ancient Peruvian herb tames hot flashes, boosts your libido – and tastes like caramel! 
Continuing coverage: Experts discuss the health benefits of macca powder for women. Lise Alschuler, ND, FABNO, clinical professor of medicine in the Department of Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted.
Woman's World ►►►

Friday, December 29, 2023

Is red meat bad for you?
University of Arizona professor of medicine and public health Andrew Weil, MD, a professor of medicine and founding director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine at the UArizona College of Medicine – Tucson, writes about the benefits of diets that eliminate, or at least limit, the amount of red or processed meat people eat.
Prevention ►►►

Thursday, December 28, 2023

7 dermatologist-approved winter skin care routines that experts swear by
Our skin may be our largest organ and appear relatively adaptable and dynamic, but it's also incredibly sensitive and reactive to its surroundings. Its frailty becomes especially apparent during wintertime. Jody Comstock, MD, dermatologist and assistant clinical professor in the Department of Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted.
Women's Wear Daily ►►►

Monday, December 25, 2023

Could this TikTok-trendy tea be the next superfood? What to know about chaga
Continuing coverage: Chaga tea has gotten attention on social media as a trendy wellness drink. Experts discuss the tea's health benefits. Lise Alschuler, ND, FABNO, clinical professor of medicine in the Department of Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted. This story has had 27 pickups by different media outlets.
Woman's World ►►►

Thursday, December 21, 2023

Four Banner Health offices in Tucson sell for $21.35M
Banner Health sold the UArizona Cancer Center facility at 1881-1891 W. Orange Grove Road for $10 million to the New York-based VanBarton Group in a sale-leaseback deal. Banner Health has been using sale-leasebacks for their properties in Tucson, and several Banner medical offices recently sold in sale-leasebacks, according to recent real estate filings. Other VanBarton Group purchases with similar sale-leaseback agreements include the Banner Multispecialty Clinic at 265 W. Ina Road and Banner Multispecialty Clinic at 7901 E. 22nd Street – both sites include primary care clinics for the Department of Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson. The first sold for $7.1 million and the second for $2.4 million. In addition, Banner University Medical Group Cholla Pediatrics sold the Tucson property at 2167 W. Orange Grove for $1.85 million to Salt Lake City's Roy S. Lulow Investment Co. and will continue to occupy the medical office with a leaseback agreement.
AZBEX ►►► 
ConnectCRE ►►► 
Real Estate Daily News ►►► 

Local experts and support lines offer strategies to manage holiday stress
The holiday season, traditionally associated with happiness and joy, also brings about a considerable amount of stress. Esther Sternberg, MD, professor of medicine and director of research at the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted. The Health Sciences Office of Communications assisted with this story.
KGUN-TV, Tucson ►►► 

CAMI takes another step forward with selection of design-build team
Continuing coverage: UArizona Health Sciences has selected the design-build team of McCarthy + SmithGroup to develop the Center for Advanced Molecular and Immunological Therapies, or CAMI. Related content.
Arizona Contractor & Community  ►►► 
Construction Superintendent ►►► 

Tuesday, December 19, 2023

As Arizona's population ages, who will provide care? Immigrants will play a big role
Immigrants are expected to play a growing role to make up for shortages in older adult care workers. Information from the Center for Rural Health at the Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health and the University of Arizona Center on Aging, co-led by Mindy Fain, MD, professor of medicine and geriatrics division chief at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is cited.
Arizona Republic  ►►► 
Yahoo ►►► 

Preservationists trying to save University of Arizona chapel designed by Paolo Soleri
Continuing coverage: Preservationists are working to save a University of Arizona chapel designed by architect Paolo Soleri. Soleri is the person behind Arcosanti and its trademark bells. The chapel is at the UArizona Cancer Center and was designated by the Tucson Historic Preservation Foundation "one of the most endangered historic places in Arizona." Pieces of the chapel are designated to be moved to a new complex for the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine, founded by Andrew Weil, MD, a professor of medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson. Related content.
KJZZ NPR Radio Phoenix ►►►  

Thursday, December 14, 2023

Stock in top pharma company crashes, shares plunge 44%
Continuing coverage: Pfizer's stock dropped more than 44% in 2023, partly because fewer people than expected opted to receive COVID-19 booster shots. The story cites a study led by researchers in the Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health that identified why less than 20% of the eligible population received COVID-19 boosters in 2022. Related content here and here.
WorldNetDaily ►►► 
Reuters ►►► 
Forbes ►►► 
Investopedia ►►► 
Wall Street Journal ►►►  
Barron's ►►► 

Tuesday, December 12, 2023

New data shows Black and Hispanic people less likely to get COVID vaccine
A new study, published in the American Journal of Public Health, shows that Hispanic and Black communities are hesitant to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Co-author Sairam Parthasarathy, MD, pulmonary division chief and professor of medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, advocates for faster, more effective and trustworthy messaging to increase interest in the vaccine in minority communities in the state. Related content here and here.
Arizona PBS KAET-TV, Phoenix ►►► 

Kelly, Sinema, Schweikert introduce bill to fight Valley fever
Arizona Sens. Mark Kelly and Kyrsten Sinema, along with Rep. David Schweikert, introduced the Finding Orphan-disease Remedies with Antifungal Research and Development Act, bipartisan legislation that supports research initiatives to combat Valley fever. John Galgiani, MD, a professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases and director of the UArizona Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted.
Yellow Sheet Report, Phoenix ►►► 
Gila Valley Central, Safford, AZ ►►► 

Saturday, December 9, 2023

Local opinion: Let’s design our office spaces like the spa industry does it
Esther Sternberg, MD
, professor of medicine and director of research for the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, writes an opinion column about the importance of designing workspaces to enhance physical health and emotional well-being.
Arizona Daily Star ►►► 

UA plans to dismantle iconic architect Paolo Soleri’s hidden-gem chapel in Tucson
UArizona renderings show the wedge where Paolo Soleri’s bells from the chapel would be moved to hang inside a cramped concrete-sided corner at the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine's new complex under construction now. The center was founded by integrative medicine pioneer Andrew Weil, MD, a professor in the Department of Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson.
Arizona Luminaria ►►► 

Thursday, December 7, 2023

Increase in cases in transition season, what if you get flu and COVID-19 simultaneously?
Experts discuss effects of getting the flu and COVID-19 at the same time. Purnima Madhivanan, MBBS, PhD, MPH, associate professor of medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson and health promotion sciences in the Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, is quoted.
Viva (Indonesia, in Indonesian) ►►► 

Can AI replicate the human touch in healthcare provision?
Continuing coverage: A UArizona Health Sciences study led by Marvin Slepian, MD, JD, cardiologist, professor of medicine and Sarver Heart Center member, found that Americans are split on whether they can trust artificial intelligence technology in their health care. The research team found that most patients aren’t convinced the diagnoses provided by AI are as trustworthy of those delivered by human medical professionals. Related content.
Lab+Life Scientist ►►► 

UArizona researchers develop a new method for early Parkinson's detection
Continuing coverage: A recent study published in Progress in Neurobiology and led by College of Medicine – Tucson researchers has developed an improved method to study Parkinson’s disease in the lab. Along the way, researchers also uncovered clues that may help scientists figure out how to detect Parkinson’s earlier and point the way toward better treatments. Lalitha Madhavan, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine and neurology at the College of Medicine – Tucson, led the study and is quoted. Related content.
KNXV-TV Phoenix ►►► 

Wednesday, December 6, 2023

UArizona researchers develop a new method for early Parkinson's detection
Continuing coverage: A recent study published in Progress in Neurobiology and led by College of Medicine – Tucson researchers has developed an improved method to study Parkinson’s disease in the lab. Along the way, researchers also uncovered clues that may help scientists figure out how to detect Parkinson’s earlier and point the way toward better treatments. Lalitha Madhavan, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine and neurology at the College of Medicine – Tucson, led the study and is quoted. Related content.
KGUN-TV Tucson ►►► 

Tuesday, December 5, 2023

Potential game-changer in Parkinson’s disease: Oxford’s new blood-based test
Continuing coverage. Research conducted at the University of Oxford has led to the inception of a blood test that could potentially identify the pathology that triggers Parkinson’s disease before the manifestation of its main symptoms. The story mentions research at the College of Medicine – Tucson by Lalitha Madhavan, MD, PhD, a professor of medicine and neurology, that developed an improved method to study Parkinson’s disease in the lab. Related content.
Medriva ►►► 

Sunday, December 3, 2023

I'm a sleep writer – here's what I do when I can't sleep
The story focuses on methods to help you get to sleep and cites the 4-7-8 Breathing Exercise, developed by Andrew Weil, MD, professor of medicine and founding director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson.
Tom's Guide ►►► 

Wednesday, November 29, 2023

Examining skin cells may aid in early Parkinson’s diagnosis
A recent study published in Progress in Neurobiology and led by College of Medicine – Tucson researchers has developed an improved method to study Parkinson’s disease in the lab. Along the way, researchers also uncovered clues that may help scientists figure out how to detect Parkinson’s earlier and point the way toward better treatments. Lalitha Madhavan, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine and neurology at the College of Medicine – Tucson, led the study and is quoted. Related content.
Parkinson's News Today ►►► 

Saturday, November 25, 2023

Climate change is hurting Arizonans' health, U.S. report says
The fifth National Climate Assessment reports incidences of Valley fever have increased sharply, driven by factors including climate change. John Galgiani, MD, professor of medicine and director of the UArizona Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted.
Arizona Daily Star ►►►

Friday, November 24, 2023

Marketplace: Offices search for a sound approach to noise levels for returning staff
Continuing coverage: A study, published in Nature Digital Medicine, on office productivity found that a noisy workplace is bad for your health, but so is a place that is extremely quiet. Co-author Esther Sternberg, MD, professor of medicine and director of research for the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, said the optimal noise level in an office comes in at about 50 decibels, comparable to moderate rain or birdsong. Related content. This story has over 800 pickups by different media outlets.
American Public Media ►►► 

Wednesday, November 22, 2023

How to amp up vaccines
Andrew Weil, MD
, professor of medicine and founding director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, writes about lifestyle changes that can maximize the effectiveness of vaccines.
Prevention (full text) ►►► 

Friday, November 17, 2023

2 gratitude practices that enhance your well-being
Esther Sternberg, MD, professor of medicine and director of research in the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, writes a piece in which experts recommend counting your blessings after waking up and before going to bed. Robert "Rocky" Crocker, MD, clinical assistant professor in the Department of Medicine and director of strategic clinical planning and implementation in the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted.
Psychology Today ►►► 
Qoshe ►►► 

Electronic pill that listens to your stomach may reveal cause of bad sleep
A new swallowable electronic capsule about the size of a multivitamin could help diagnose sleep apnea and other sleep disorders. Sairam Parthasarathy, MD, Pulmonary division chief and director of the Center for Sleep, Circadian and Neuroscience Research at UArizona Health Sciences, is quoted.
Newsweek ►►► 

Thursday, November 16, 2023

Improved lab study method may enable earlier Parkinson's diagnosis
A recent study published in Progress in Neurobiology and led by College of Medicine – Tucson researchers has developed an improved method to study Parkinson’s disease in the lab. Along the way, researchers also uncovered clues that may help scientists figure out how to detect Parkinson’s earlier and point the way toward better treatments. Lalitha Madhavan, MD, PhD, associate professor of neurology at the College of Medicine – Tucson, led the study and is quoted. Related content.
Science Magazine ►►► 
Bioengineer ►►► 
MedicalXpress ►►► 
Psychreg ►►► 
Technology Networks ►►► 
Bollyinside ►►► 
Mirage News ►►► 

Wednesday, November 15, 2023

5 Ways to Make Your Workspace Your Sanctuary
Esther Sternberg, MD
, a professor of medicine and founding director of the Institute on Place, Wellbeing & Performance, talks about creating wellbeing wherever you are by getting in the zone with micromedications, mini-rituals, meaning, community and flow.
Psychology Today ►►► 

Monday, November 13, 2023

UArizona resident led study wins Social Media Campaign of Year at Healthcare Marketing Impact Awards 2023
Continuing coverage: Four in 10 posts about liver disease on TikTok contain misinformation, with most pushing inaccurate claims about fad diets, "detox" drinks and herbal remedies, according to a Northwelll Health study being presented today at the Digestive Disease Week 2023 conference. Macklin Gardner Loveland, MD, the study's lead author and an internal medicine resident at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted.
AdAge ►►► (PDF)

Tucson native Dr. Andrew Weil opens True Food Kitchen in the Foothills
Continuing coverage: True Food Kitchen, a national restaurant chain owned by University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson professor of medicine and public health Andrew Weil, MD, opens today in La Encantada Mall in the Catalina Foothills.
KGUN-TV Tucson ►►►

Friday, November 10, 2023

14 herbs and spices for rheumatoid arthritis symptom relief
Ashwagandha, also called "Indian ginseng," has been used for millennia to ease pain, reduce stress and treat other conditions. Research has found taking the herbal treatment as a powder in conjunction with sidh makardhwaj, a mix of herbal and mineral ingredients, eases pain and joint swelling in people with rheumatoid arthritis. Lise Alschuler, ND, FABNO, clinical professor of medicine in the Department of Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted.
Everyday Health ►►►

Addressing Arizona’s primary care shortage
Continuing coverage: In an effort to meet the growing need for primary care physicians in Arizona, UArizona Health Sciences is working to develop a new generation of primary care physicians through the Primary Care Physician Scholarship Program, which awarded scholarships to 14 College of Medicine – Tucson students and 11 College of Medicine – Phoenix students. Related content.
The Journal of Healthcare Contracting ►►► 

Thursday, November 9, 2023

Helping older adults age well in rural America
With fewer health care providers, fewer professional caregivers and fewer young people than in urban areas, rural communities struggle to care for aging residents. Mindy Fain, MD, geriatrics division chief and professor at the College of Medicine – Tucson and co-director of the Arizona Center on Aging, is quoted. She would like to see Medicare Advantage plans be required to offer home-based primary care to patients who struggle to come into clinics.
The Commonwealth Fund ►►►

UArizona professor takes part in Navajo Christmas Airlift
Continuing coverage: Local pilot Geoffrey Block, MD, MSc, FACP, clinical professor of medicine and medical director of liver transplant and director of the Liver Institute at the College of Medicine – Tucson, flew his personal plane to the Navajo Nation with donations that the institute has been collecting since early July. Block is quoted. Related content.
White Mountain Independent (Show Low, AZ) ►►►

Wednesday, November 8, 2023

Buckmaster Show: How the food we eat has changed
Victoria Maizes, MD, professor of medicine and executive director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, is interviewed about topics including the health ramifications of eating processed food.
KVOI-Radio AM1030 Tucson ►►►

Tuesday, November 7, 2023

Why Valley fever could eventually impact more people across the Western US
Valley fever, which traditionally afflicts patients in Arizona and California, has started spreading eastward. John Galgiani, MD, professor of medicine and director of the UArizona Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is interviewed. This story had 50 pickups by different media outlets.
InvestigateTV ►►► 

UArizona announces $118.65M in gifts toward $3B campaign
UArizona announced the public phase of its $3 billion fundraising campaign, Fuel Wonder. The story cites philanthropy that led to naming of the R. Ken Coit College of Pharamacy and donor investments in the College of Medicine – Tucson’s Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine and the UArizona Health Sciences Center for Advanced Molecular and Immunological Therapies, known as CAMI. The Center for Integrative Medicine was founded by director Andrew Weil, MD, a professor of medicine.
BizTucson ►►► 

Friday, November 3, 2023

Policymakers, experts to meet in Phoenix for Valley fever workshop
National and state public health policymakers and experts gathered Friday in Phoenix to address the emerging public health problem posed by Valley fever. John Galgiani, MD, an infectious diseases professor in the Department of Medicine and director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is interviewed.
KPNX-TV Phoenix ►►► 

Incorporating AI in healthcare: A trust-building approach
Continuing coverage: Taking steps to demystify artificial intelligence can make it accessible to patients and beneficial for clinicians. The stories cite a UArizona Health Sciences study led by Marvin Slepian, MD, JD, cardiologist, Regents Professor and Sarver Heart Center member, that found that Americans are split on whether they can trust artificial intelligence technology in their health care. Related content.
HealthData Management ►►► 
MHealth Intelligence ►►► 

Monday, October 30, 2023

Award of Merit Small Project: UArizona Health Science Center
The publication gave the Center for Sleep, Circadian and Neuroscience Research, led by Pulmonary Division Chief Sairam Parthasarathy, MD, at the UArizona Health Sciences an Award of Merit, Small Project in its 2023 Southwest Best Projects honors.
Engineering News-Record ►►►

Saturday, October 28, 2023

New therapies to improve outcomes for patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma
Th University of Arizona Cancer Center’s Rachna Shroff, MD, MS, associate dean of clinical and translational research, associate professor and chief of the Division of Hematology and Oncology in the College of Medicine – Tucson, is interviewed on recent advancements in treatments for intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.
Targeted Oncology ►►►

Thursday, October 26, 2023

The best ways to heal your body and mind
Andrew Weil, MD
, professor of medicien and founding director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, is interviewed about holistic self-care options.
The Ultimate Health Podcast ►►► 

Skin cancer fundraiser
The Skin Cancer Research Fundraiser Silent Auction in SadddleBrooke on Nov. 11 will benefit the UArizona Cancer Center's Skin Cancer Insitute, co-led by Clara Curiel-Lewandrowski, MD, who also is dermatology division chief in the College of Medicine – Tucson.
Arizona Daily Star ►►► 

Monday, October 23, 2023

Four breathing exercises to do with your partner to counteract stress and strengthen your connection
Deep breathing techniques have been shown to reduce stress and improve mood. Andrew Weil, MD, professor of medicien and founding director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, and one of the breathing practices he has popularized, are mentioned.
Well and Good ►►► 

Why do we wake up earlier as we age?
Continuing coverage: People tend to wake up earlier as they get older due to the brain becoming less responsive as people age to factors such as sunlight, social cues and physical activity, which indicate where in the day we are at any given time. Sairam Parthasarathy, MD, director of the Center for Sleep, Circadian and Neuroscience Research at UArizona Health Sciences, is quoted.
MSN ►►► 

Thursday, October 19, 2023

What is whole person health? A beginner's guide to the interconnectedness of body, mind and your environment
A narrative review of 125 studies that examined "whole-person models of primary care" singled out the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine, founded by Andrew Weil, MD, a professor of medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, as a particularly successful and exemplary program.
Everyday Health ►►► 

American patients divided on comfort with AI in health care
Continuing coverage: A UArizona Health Sciences study found that Americans are split on whether they can trust artificial intelligence technology in their health care. The research team led by Marvin Slepian, MD, JD, cardiologist, Regents Professor and Sarver Heart Center member, found that most patients aren’t convinced the diagnoses provided by AI are as trustworthy of those delivered by human medical professionals. Related content.
Express Healthcare Management ►►► 

Monday, October 16, 2023

Male breast cancer survivor tells story of diagnosis
Continuing coverage: A profile of breast cancer survivor Eric Hanson, who compliments the UArizona Cancer Center for his treatment.
Inside Tucson Business ►►► 

Thursday, October 12, 2023

StimAire concludes injectable stimulator study for OSA
Neuromodulation company StimAire, which collaborated with researchers at the College of Medicine – Tucson, has concluded the first-in-human study of an injectable stimulator for obstructive sleep apnea in Australia. Members of the Center for Sleep, Circadian and Neuroscience Research, led by pulmonary division chief Sairam Parthasarathy, MD, were involved in the study.
Medical Device Network ►►► 

Episode 906: How to optimize your workspace for your well-being with Dr. Esther Sternberg
Esther Sternberg, MD
, professor of medicine and director of research in the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is interviewed about how people can enhance their office environments to improve both their health and professional performance.
How to Be Awesome at Your Job (podcast) ►►►

Tucson man opens up about stigma of male breast cancer
A Tucson man that first noticed a lump in his chest in 2018 and had a partial mastectomy is now cancer-free after receiving treatment at the University of Arizona Cancer Center.
KOLD-TV Tucson ►►► 
KNXV-TV Phoenix ►►► 

Tuesday, October 10, 2023

High demand continues for medical office investments
Medical office buildings remain in high demand in a weak real estate market. The story cites the August sale of Banner – University North Campus, which encompasses the UArizona Cancer Center, for $134 million.
Real Estate Daily News ►►► 

Buckmaster Show: The signs that your COVID shot is working
Continuing coverage: Victoria Maizes, MD, professor of medicine and executive director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, is interviewed about how reactions such as chills, fatigue, headache and malaise that can follow vaccination may be signs of a vigorous immune response. Related content.
KVOI-Radio AM1030 Tucson ►►►

Sunday, October 8, 2023

Turmeric: The miracle herb that can be the answer for your indigestion & acne problems!
Continuing coverage: A new study concludes the spice turmeric – often sold in supplements as curcumin – could be effective at alleviating stomach discomfort. Previous research led by Janet L. Funk, MD, professor of medicine and vice chair for research in the Department of Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is cited.
The Economic Times (India) ►►►

Thursday, October 5, 2023

Holistic integrative ophthalmology
Pediatrics is slowly moving toward including more holistic and integrative medicine. Andrew Weil, MD, professor of medicine and founding director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, is cited as an influence.
The VisionHelp Blog ►►► 

Tuesday, October 3, 2023

Arizona's Tommy Lloyd says loss to Princeton will keep driving him 'the rest of my career'
Arizona basketball coaches Adia Barnes and Tommy Lloyd appeared Monday at the 2023 Bear Down Celebration, which benefited the UArizona Arthritis Center. C. Kent Kwoh, MD, director of the Arthritis Center and chief of the Division of Rheumatology at the College of Medicine – Tucson’s Department of Medicine, is quoted. Related content.
Arizona Daily Star ►►► 

5 things to know when selecting an integrative health care provider
A guide to choosing integrative health care providers. A database maintained by the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine, founded by Andrew Weil, MD, a professor of medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, is referenced as a resource. 
Everyday Health ►►► 

True Foods, 2 new-to-Tucson shops are opening in La Encantada this year
True Food Kitchen, which was founded in Phoenix in 2008, will expand to Tucson by the end of the year. The menu is based on Dr. Weil's Anti-Inflammatory Food Pyramid, created by Andrew Weil, MD, professor of medicine and founding director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson.
Arizona Daily Star ►►► 
KVOA-TV Tucson ►►► 

Sunday, October 1, 2023

Reminding Arizonans to keep safe from dangerous fungi that can cause Valley fever
Continuing coverage: An explainer on the causes and symptoms of Valley fever. The story cites information from the Valley Fever Center for Excellence, led by infectious diseases professor John N. Galgiani, MD, in the College of Medicine – Tucson.
Tucson Sentinel ►►►

Friday, September 29, 2023

COPD patients see promise of new therapies to ease discomfort, aid breathing
Continuing coverage: Recent advances in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease offer patients more hope in easing discomfort from a condition that can cause severe airflow blockage and breathing-related problems. Joshua Malo, MD, associate professor of medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted.
ReachMD ►►►

The surprisingly effective health fix in your spice rack
Continuing coverage: A new study concludes the spice turmeric – often sold in supplements as curcumin – could be effective at alleviating stomach discomfort. Previous research led by University of Arizona professor Janet Funk, MD, an endocrinologist and research vice chair in the Department of Medicine, found curcumin supplements probably helped relieve for osteoarthritis and provided some benefit to people with insulin resistance or diabetes. This story was picked up by at least four media outlets.
The Telegraph (UK) ►►►

Thursday, September 28, 2023

Here are the winners of the 2023 AZBio Awards: Dr. John Galgiani
The Arizona Bioindustry Association gave John Galgiani, MD, professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases and director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the College of Medicine – Tucson, the 2023 AZBio Pioneer Award for Lifetime Achievement. Related content.
AZ Big Media Phoenix ►►► 

Reminding Arizonans to keep safe from dangerous fungi that can cause Valley fever
Continuing coverage: An explainer on the causes and symptoms of Valley fever. The story cites information from the Valley Fever Center for Excellence, led by infectious diseases professor John N. Galgiani, MD, in the College of Medicine – Tucson.
City Sun Times – Phoenix ►►► 

Wednesday, September 27, 2023

Reminding Arizonans to keep yourselves safe from dangerous fungi that can cause Valley fever
An explainer on the causes and symptoms of Valley fever. The story cites information from the UArizona Valley Fever Center for Excellence in the College of Medicine – Tucson led by John Galgiani, MD, a professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases.
Gila Valley Central (Safford, AZ) ►►►

Wednesday, September 20, 2023

University of Nebraska names new director of Buffett Cancer Center
Continuing coverage: Joann Sweasy, PhD, the Nancy C. and Craig M. Berge endowed chair for the UArizona Cancer Center, has been named director of the Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center and the Eppley Institute for Research in Cancer and Allied Diseases, which are both in the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Meanwhile, the UArizona Cancer Center appointed Juanita Merchant, MD, PhD (Division of Gastroenterology chief), Rachna Shroff, MD, MS (Division of Hematology & Oncology chief), and Clara Curiel-Lewandrowski, MD (Division of Dermatology chief and Skin Cancer Institute co-director) as the interim management team. Related content.
Lincoln Journal-Star (Lincoln, NE) ►►► 

COPD patients see promise of new therapies to ease discomfort, aid breathing
Recent advances in treatments for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease – an umbrella of conditions including emphysema and bronchitis – offer patients more hope for relief from discomfort caused by severe airflow blockage and breathing-related problems. A number of trials are examining efficacy of new formulations of older therapies and more novel options, said Joshua Malo, MD, pulmonologist and associate professor at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson.
Germanic.news (Germany, in German) ►►►
Yahoo News ►►► 
UPI ►►►

Valley fever is a growing fungal threat to outdoor workers
Ongoing coverage. Valley fever's mortality rate runs about one death per 1,000 infections, said John Galgiani, MD, a professor of infectious diseases and director of the University of Arizona Valley Fever Center for Excellence. It doesn't need to be so high. To show a vaccine could be effective against Coccidioides, Dr. Galgiani and his team started by focusing on an immunization for dogs with the infection. The canine vaccine he helped to develop has already proved itself. He believes, if funding allows, a human version of his vaccine could be ready for approval within eight years. Related content.
Nature ►►►

Tuesday, September 19, 2023

Valley fever is a growing fungal threat to outdoor workers
Valley fever's mortality rate runs about one death per 1,000 infections, said John Galgiani, MD, a professor of infectious diseases and director of the University of Arizona Valley Fever Center for Excellence. It doesn't need to be so high. To show a vaccine could be effective against Coccidioides, Dr. Galgiani and his team started by focusing on an immunization for dogs with the infection. The canine vaccine he helped to develop has already proved itself. He believes, if funding allows, a human version of his vaccine could be ready for approval within eight years. Related content.
Scientific American ►►►

Friday, September 15, 2023

Q&A on the updated COVID-19 vaccines
Sairam Parthasarathy, MD, principal investigator of the Arizona CEAL COVID Consortium and the Researching COVID to Enhance Recovery (RECOVER) study — both part of broader National Institutes of Health initiatives — and a professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine in the Department of Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted saying he supports the CDC recommendation that everyone six months and older get the updated vaccine.
MSN ►►►

David Alberts, founding member of the University of Arizona Cancer Center, dies at 83
Ongoing coverage. As a founding member of the University of Arizona Cancer Center, David Alberts, MD, and his influence on cancer research epitomizes Isaac Newton’s famous quote, “If I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.”
The Cancer Letter ►►►

Thursday, September 14, 2023

Do they mask? Are they eating out? How COVID experts are living now
While cases of COVID-related severe illness and hospitalization remain low, infection counts are spiking again. Medical experts discuss precautions they continue to take to avoid infections. Division of Infectious Diseases chief in the Department of Medicine, Elizabeth Connick, MD, is quoted. (Originally posted Sept. 7; updated Sept. 14)
Washington Post ►►►

Wednesday, September 13, 2023

What can turmeric actually do for your health?
Previous research led by Janet L. Funk, MD, endocrinology professor and vice chair for research in the Department of Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, found curcumin — or turmeric — supplements provided some benefits for osteoarthritis and insulin resistance or diabetes; however, some products contained industrial solvent residues, albeit below toxic levels.
New York Times ►►►

The difference between integrative and functional medicine
Continuing coverage: An explainer describing the differences in two types of alternatives to conventional medicine. Andrew Weil, MD, professor of medicine and founder and director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted from a previous interview.
Epoch Times (France, in French) ►►►

Wednesday, September 6, 2023

Buckmaster Show: A frank discussion about death and dying
Victoria Maizes, MD, professor of medicine and executive director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, is interviewed about the importance of discussing end-of-life care with loved ones.
KVOI-Radio AM1030 Tucson ►►►

Monday, September 4, 2023

The difference between integrative and functional medicine
An explainer describing the differences in two types of alternatives to conventional medicine. Andrew Weil, MD, founder and director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the UArizona College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted from a previous interview.
The Epoch Times ►►►

Sunday, September 3, 2023

Half of Valley fever infections come from Maricopa County: Here's what you need to know
The Valley fever fungus thrives in desert conditions, such as those in Phoenix. The drier the condition, the easier it is for the spores to get into the air. John Galgiani, MD, infectious diseases professor and director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted.
Arizona Republic ►►►

Friday, September 1, 2023

Valley fever concerns following massive dust storm in metro Phoenix
A massive dust storm delayed football games around Phoenix on Friday, raising concerns that Valley fever will spread. John Galgiani, MD, infectious diseases professor and director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted. 
KTVK-TV AZ Family 3TV & CBS 5 News Phoenix ►►►

Recently published UArizona Health Sciences study uncovers new details about long COVID
Continuing coverage: A new National Institutes of Health study provides an expanded working definition of long COVID. UArizona Health Sciences researchers lead one of 15 adult cohorts that contributed to the research. Pulmonary chief Sairam Parthasarathy, MD, is among Department of Medicine faculty participating in related research under the RECOVER program. Related content.
KUAZ 89.1FM NPR Radio ►►►

Thursday, August 31, 2023

Creating wellbeing spaces to de-stress and keep you well
In a column, Esther Sternberg, MD, professor of medicine and director of research at the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, writes that the spaces where you work and live can determine how resistant people are to illness and stress. 
Psychology Today ►►►

The simple reason why you wake up earlier as you age
Continuing coverage: Experts explain why people wake up earlier as they get older. Sairam Parthasarathy, MD, director of the UArizona Health Sciences Center for Sleep and Circadian Sciences, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine in the Department of Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted. This story had more than 40 media pickups.
Lifestyle ao Minuto (Portugal, in Portuguese) ►►►
HuffPost ►►►
BuzzFeed ►►►
Yahoo Life ►►►
Upstract ►►►

Can AI replicate the human touch in health care provision?
Continuing coverage: A UArizona Health Sciences study found that Americans are split on whether they can trust artificial intelligence technology in their health care. The research team, led by University of Arizona cardiologist and Regents Professor Marvin Slepian, MD, found most patients aren’t convinced diagnoses provided by AI are as trustworthy of those delivered by human medical professionals. Related content.
Analytics Week ►►►
HIT Consultant ►►►
Medical Plastics News ►►►

Tuesday, August 29, 2023

UArizona startup, researcher to receive AzBio awards
The Arizona Bioindustry Association announced the recipients of this year's AZBio awards, including two with ties to UArizona. At a ceremony on Sept. 27, one of three Fast Lane awards will go to Reglagene, Inc., which licensed technology from the R. Ken Coit College of Pharmacy and the BIO5 Institute, to develop a medication that induces cancer cells to grow old and die. The Pioneer Award for Lifetime Achievement will go to John Galgiani, MD, infectious diseases professor and director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the College of Medicine – Tucson. Related content.
BizTucson ►►►

Friday, August 25, 2023

Together We Fight: Take a swing at cancer
The MountainView/Preserve Women’s Golf Association will hold a golf tournament Feb. 20, 2024, to raise funds to fight cancer. Every dollar raised goes to the UArizona Cancer Center. The afternoon includes a silent auction, raffle prizes and buffet. Sign up now.
Arizona Daily Star ►►►

Wednesday, August 23, 2023

Opinion: This Valley fever vaccine could save dogs, eventually humans
Communities affected by Valley fever got positive news in 2021 when researchers at the Valley Fever Center for Excellence, directed by infectious diseases professor John Galgiani, MD, in the College of Medicine – Tucson and other institutions reported they had developed an effective canine vaccine. In his column, writer John Murphy describes Valley fever as a growing global threat to both people and dogs and urges people to work together to combat the illness. Related content.
San Jose Mercury News
( San Jose, Calif.) ►►►

Buckmaster Show: Recapping Monsoon 2023
Victoria Maizes, MD, professor of medicine and executive director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, is interviewed about topics including recommended dietary adjustments for those with irritable bowel syndrome.
KVOI-Radio AM1030 Tucson ►►►

Monday, August 21, 2023

UArizona Valley fever expert Galgiani to receive lifetime achievement award
The Arizona Bioindustry Association announced that John Galgiani, MD, University of Arizona infectious diseases professor and director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is the 2023 recipient of the AZBio Pioneer Award for Lifetime Achievement. Michael M.I. Abecassis, MD, MBA, Iovanna C. Lopez Dean of the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted. Related content
Science Magazine ►►►
Bioengineering ►►►

Wednesday, August 16, 2023

Business awards earned in Tucson and Southern Arizona
U.S. News & World Report named the UArizona Cancer Center No. 1 in Southern Arizona for high performance in cancer treatment. In addition, Banner – UMC Tucson was rated as “High-Performing” in one adult specialty, cancer, and nine adult procedures/conditions Related content.
Arizona Daily Star ►►►

Monday, August 14, 2023

UArizona Cancer Center gets $1.5 million grant for new training program
Continuing coverage: UArizona Cancer Center researchers were awarded a $1.5 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to deliver a cancer prevention and control research training program for undergraduate and graduate students called “Student Transformative Experiences to Progress Undergraduate and Graduate Professionals.” The Cancer Center's Jennifer Bea, PhD, faculty member in the Hematology and Oncology division of the Department of Medicine, is quoted. Related content.
KJZZ NPR Radio Phoenix ►►►

ENR Southwest Announces Winners of Best Projects Competition
The University of Arizona Health Sciences Center for Sleep, Circadian and Neuroscience Research, located in Tucson, Ariz., won a Award of Merit for Best Small Project among Southwest construction projects. The center is led by director Sairam Parthasarathy, MD, professor of medicine, chief of the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine and the Murray and Clara Walker Memorial Endowed Chair in Emphysema at the UArizona College of Medicine - Tucson.
ENR Southwest ►►►

Wednesday, August 9, 2023

Can artificial intelligence replicate the human touch in healthcare?
Continuing coverage: Research by the University of Arizona led by cardiologist, Arizona Regents Professor and Sarver Heart Center member Marvin Slepian, MD, JD, found just over half of people surveyed would choose a human doctor rather than artificial intelligence for their medical diagnosis and treatment, although more put faith in the technology if guided by a human touch. Related content.
Manufacturing Chemist (UK) ►►►

Cancer research training grant helps expand workforce for cancer prevention and control
Continuing coverage: UArizona Cancer Center researchers were awarded a $1.5 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to deliver an intensive, multidisciplinary cancer prevention and control research training program for undergraduate and graduate students called “Student Transformative Experiences to Progress Undergraduate and Graduate Professionals” known as “STEP-UP.” Principal investigator Jennifer Bea, PhD, co-leader of the Cancer Center’s Cancer Prevention and Control Research Program and associate professor in the College of Medicine – Tucson's Division of Hematology & Oncology, and project co-investigator Robin Harris PhD, MPH, professor of health promotion sciences at the Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, are quoted. Related content.
Science Magazine ►►►
NewsMedical.net ►►►

Tuesday, August 8, 2023

UArizona’s Dr. Esther Sternberg Pens Book on Workplace Wellness
In her new book, WELL AT WORK: Creating Wellbeing in any Workspace, which goes on sale Sept. 5, integrative health pioneer Esther Sternberg, MD, a professor of medicine and research director for the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine, offers a menu of simple steps anyone can take to design their workspace for health, happiness, and productivity.
BizTucson ►►►

Grant provides cancer research training experience to expand workforce for cancer prevention and control
UArizona Cancer Center researchers were awarded a $1.5 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to deliver an intensive, multidisciplinary cancer prevention and control research training program for undergraduate and graduate students called “Student Transformative Experiences to Progress Undergraduate and Graduate Professionals” known as “STEP-UP.” Principal investigator Jennifer Bea, PhD, co-leader of the Cancer Center’s Cancer Prevention and Control Research Program and associate professor in the College of Medicine – Tucson's Division of Hematology & Oncology, and project co-investigator Robin Harris PhD, MPH, professor of health promotion sciences at the Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, are quoted. Related content.
Science Magazine ►►►
Bioengineer.org ►►►

Monday, August 7, 2023

Data shows Valley fever is spiking in Phoenix area right now
Continuing coverage: Seasonal spread of Valley fever is typically very unpredictable. But researchers say new data analysis is giving clues that the fungal respiratory infection is spiking right now. UArizona Valley Fever Center for Excellence researcher Fariba Donovan, MD, PhD, an associate professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is interviewed by KJZZ's Lauren Gilger on The Show. Related content.
KJZZ NPR Radio Phoenix ►►►

CDC says Valley Fever cases could rise 25 times due to climate change
Continuing coverage: With rising temperatures widening the spread of arid lands in the U.S., the Centers for Disease Control estimates in coming decades, Valley Fever could infect more than half a million Americans each year - compared to around 20,000 who fall sick annually now. John Galgiani, MD, a professor of medicine and director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the College of Medicine – Tucson, said there’s currently one-in-five chance if you get pneumonia in Arizona that it’s caused by Valley fever. Related content.
Daily Mail (UK) ►►►
Sound Health & Lasting Wealth ►►►

Thursday, August 3, 2023

University of Arizona professor answers growing concerns over AI taking over jobs
Continuing coverage. Goldman Sachs estimates generative A.I.'s global impact could affect some 300 million jobs. From ChatGPT to A.I. taking orders at restaurants, growing signs indicate the technology is already disrupting the global workforce. "Humans invented A.I. and, therefore, we have to be the masters of this. It's not going to instantly replace everything we do," said University of Arizona Regents Professor and cardiologist Marvin Slepian, MD, JD. "(And) as long as we maintain that attitude I think moving forward for everybody, particularly students who are in school thinking about new jobs, that type of attitude will allow A.I. to be a supplement." Related content.
KVOA News4 TV Tucson ►►►

The HIMALAYA Study and Optimal Sequencing in Patients with Advanced HCC
Rachna Shroff, MD, MS, professor of medicine and interim chief, Division of Hematology & Oncology, appears in two OncLive PeerExchange episodes on Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC), or liver cancer – “Updates in First-Line Systemic Therapy for Advanced HCC: The HIMALAYA Study” and “Optimal Sequencing in Patients with Advanced HCC” – hosting panel discussions as part of a video series posted by the Oncology Specialty Group, which publishes OncologyLive, Oncology Fellows and Oncology Nursing News.
OncLive ►►►

Wednesday, August 2, 2023

Heat is hitting some hard, especially for those with chronic pain
The effects of cold weather on people with arthritis are well known but the humidity and barometric pressure that accompany the Monsoon present their own problems. "There are different types of arthritis. There are actually arthritis patients who tend to do worse with hotter temperatures," said Ernest Vina, MD, a University of Arizona associate professor of medicine in the Division of Rheumatology and member of the UArizona Arthritis Center.
KOLD 13News TV Tucson ►►►

Tuesday, August 1, 2023

Six best hospitals in Arizona for cancer 2023-2024
Among the six best hospitals in Arizona for cancer, according to the annual listings, are Banner – University Medical Center Tucson and the UArizona Cancer Center, affiliated with the College of Medicine – Tucson, as well as Banner – University Medical Center Phoenix and its association with the College of Medicine – Phoenix. The Division of Hematology & Oncology is among 12 in the Department of Medicine, the largest department in the College of Medicine – Tucson.
U.S. News & World Report ►►►

Monday, July 31, 2023

Valley fever: Climate behind huge uptick in cases
Continuing coverage: Studying Valley fever trends, a team at the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the College of Medicine – Tucson has created a forecasting tool to determine when the illness is spiking in the community as it is in Arizona now. Further research indicate infections are spreading geographically due in part to climate change. John Galgiani, MD, professor of medicine and director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence, and center member Andrew Comie, PhD, professor in the School of Geography, Development and Environment, are quoted. Related content.
The Weather Channel ►►►
KTAR-Radio 92.3FM Phoenix ►►►
KTVK AZFamily3 & CBS5 TV Phoenix ►►►
KNXV ABC15 TV Phoenix ►►►
KASW CW61 TV Phoenix ►►►

Sunday, July 30, 2023

It's Valley fever season in Phoenix, University of Arizona researcher says
Continuing coverage: University of Arizona researchers report a spike in cases of Valley fever in Phoenix. "We have a brand-new tool to understand when the disease is in the community, and it has to do with working with Banner Health, which has 44 urgent cares, most of which are in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area," said John Galgiani, MD, director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence and a professor in the Department of Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson. Related content.
WFLD-TV (Chicago) ►►►
WQRF-TV (Rockford, Illinois) ►►►

Friday, July 28, 2023

University of Arizona researcher says it's Valley fever season in Phoenix
Continuing coverage: University of Arizona researchers report a spike in cases of Valley fever in Phoenix. "We have a brand-new tool to understand when the disease is in the community, and it has to do with working with Banner Health, which has 44 urgent cares, most of which are in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area," said John Galgiani, MD, director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence and a professor in the Department of Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson. Related content.
Nouvelles-du-Monde (France) ►►►
KSAV Fox10 TV Phoenix ►►►

The IMbrave150 Trial and Role of Adjuvant Therapy in Patients with Early-Stage HCC
Rachna Shroff, MD, MS
, professor of medicine and interim chief, Division of Hematology & Oncology, appears in two OncLive PeerExchange episodes on Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC), or liver cancer – “Updates in First-Line Systemic Therapy for Advanced HCC: The IMbrave150 Trial” and “The Role of Adjuvant Therapy in Patients with Early-Stage HCC” – hosting panel discussions as part of a video series posted by the Oncology Specialty Group, which publishes OncologyLive, Oncology Fellows and Oncology Nursing News.
OncLive ►►►

Thursday, July 27, 2023

Data show Valley fever spike in Phoenix area
Researchers with the University of Arizona Valley Fever Center for Excellence report a spike in cases of the fungal infection around Phoenix. "It's very clear we've been in a high season over the past several weeks," said center director John Galgiani, MD, a professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the College of Medicine – Tucson. "Right now, if you get pneumonia diagnosed, there's about a one-in-five chance that pneumonia is caused by Valley fever." Related content.
KJZZ NPR Radio Phoenix ►►►

Wednesday, July 26, 2023

Buckmaster Show: Early cancer detection is the key to saving lives
Experts discuss the urgency of early cancer detection. Victoria Maizes, MD, professor in the Department of Medicine and executive director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, and Mohammad Khreiss, MD, FACS, FSSO, clinical associate professor of surgery at the College of Medicine – Tucson, are interviewed.
KVOI-Radio AM1030 Tucson ►►►

A visit to Lourdes, the site of mystery and medical miracles
This week on 60 Minutes, correspondent Bill Whitaker reports on the Lourdes Office of Medical Observations, where world-renowned doctors and researchers conduct decade-long investigations into the countless claims of cures. Esther Sternberg, MD, professor in the Department of Medicine and director of research at the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the UArizona College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted.
CBS News ►►►
Heromag ►►►

Monday, July 24, 2023

New clues arise to consequences of calcium crystal deposition in knee OA
A new Boston University study supports the idea there may be a larger subset of patients who may have a calcium mineralization component to their knee osteoarthritis, said C. Kent Kwoh, MD, professor of medicine and medical imaging at the University of Arizona, Tucson. Dr. Kwoh reviewed it and another study and provided perspective. He is an editorial advisory board member for MDedge Rheumatology.
Rheumatology News ►►►

Sunday, July 23, 2023

Artificial intelligence: Can AI Chatbots in Healthcare Earn Patients’ Trust?
Continuing coverage: A study found that Americans are split on whether they can trust artificial intelligence technology in their health care. The research team, led by UArizona Cardiology's Marvin Slepian, MD, JD, found most patients aren’t convinced the diagnoses provided by AI are as trustworthy of those delivered by human medical professionals. Related content.
Metro (UK) ►►►
Cryptopolitan ►►►

Wednesday, July 19, 2023

GI oncologist says 'opening doors' for other women is her calling, responsibility
Continuing coverage. For Rachna Shroff, MD, MS, FASCO, interim Hem-Onc Division chief at the UArizona College of Medicine – Tucson, opening doors for other women in oncology, by amplifying and demonstrating the importance and impact of gender equity among women in the field, is her ultimate passion. She received the Healio Woman Disruptor of the Year award, given jointly with Women in Medicine at the ASCO annual meeting in June, for her efforts as a woman who continuously leads and sets the tone for younger women on how a successful career can unfold.
Healio ►►►

Factoring Stage, Liver Function into Treatment Decision-Making for HCC
Rachna Shroff, MD, MS
, professor of medicine and interim chief, Division of Hematology & Oncology, appears in two OncLive PeerExchange episodes on Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC), or liver cancer – “Treatment Approaches for Patients With Early-Stage HCC” and “Factoring Stage and Hepatic Function into Treatment Decision-Making for HCC” – hosting panel discussions as part of a video series posted by the Oncology Specialty Group, which publishes OncologyLive, Oncology Fellows and Oncology Nursing News.
OncLive ►►►

Arizona sun leads to increased surface burns and creation of Patient Registry, Imaging and Tissue Bank tool
Continuing coverage: The Patient Registry, Imaging Database and Tissue Bank, or PRIT, represents a unique resource researchers can use to develop novel tools to help doctors diagnose and predict likely outcomes for skin cancer. Clara N. Curiel-Lewandrowski, MD, chief of the Division of Dermatology at the College of Medicine – Tucson and co-director of the UArizona Cancer Center's Skin Cancer Institute, is quoted. Related content.
State of Reform ►►►

Journal concludes turmeric is fool’s gold: 'There are claims it can cure everything'
Turmeric is hailed for helping a host of conditions: high cholesterol, hay fever, depression, gingivitis, premenstrual syndrome and even hangovers. Research has muted many of those claims, finding that while there may be some benefits, it is not as powerful as many believe it to be, according to the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. Janet L. Funk, MD, professor of medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson and vice chair of research for the Department of Medicine, is interviewed.
Before It's News ►►►

8 times when vitamins and supplements may be good self-care
Generally, a healthy diet supplies all the nutrients people need. Occasionally, supplements can be complementary medicine. Victoria Maizes, MD, professor of medicine at the UArizona College of Medicine – Tucson and executive director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine, is quoted.
Everyday Health ►►►

Monday, July 17, 2023

Why do babies smile in their sleep?
It can be awfully cute when babies grin while sleeping—but is it a real smile, or just a reflex? Experts discuss why babies smile in their sleep. Daniel Combs, MD, assistant professor of pediatrics and medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson and member of the Center for Sleep, Circadian and Neuroscience Research, is quoted.
Parents ►►►

Thursday, July 13, 2023

A deadly fungus is creeping toward Canada because of climate change
Climate change is allowing Valley fever, which traditionally afflicts patients in Arizona, to potentially spread to places as far away as Canada. Fariba Donovan, MD, PhD, assistant professor at the College of Medicine – Tucson and member of the college’s Valley Fever Center for Excellence, is interviewed. 
CBC (Canada) ►►►

Wednesday, July 12, 2023

A deadly fungus is creeping toward Canada because of climate change
Climate change is allowing Valley fever, which traditionally afflicts patients in Arizona, to potentially spread to places as far away as Canada. Fariba Donovan, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson and researcher at the college’s Valley Fever Center for Excellence, is interviewed.
CBC News (Canada) ►►►

Overview of Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) and Diagnosing Patients
Rachna Shroff, MD, MS
, professor of medicine and interim chief, Division of Hematology & Oncology, appears in two OncLive PeerExchange episodes on Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC), or liver cancer – “Overview of Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC)” and “Diagnosing Patients with HCC” – hosting panel discussions as part of a video series posted by the Oncology Specialty Group, which publishes OncologyLive, Oncology Fellows and Oncology Nursing News.
OncLive ►►►

Thursday, July 6, 2023

Senators urge USDA approval of Valley fever vaccine for dogs
Continuing coverage: Researchers from the University of Arizona Valley Fever Center for Excellence, led by infectious diseases professor John Galgiani, MD, announced in 2021 they had successfully found a way to prevent Valley fever in dogs, which is now up for approval by the U.S. Department of Agriculture with support from Arizona Sen. Kyrsten Sinema and Sen. Mark Kelly. The lawmakers told USDA regulators they hope approval of a veterinary vaccine will pave the way for a development of a similar shot for humans. Related content.
KJZZ NPR Radio Phoenix ►►►

Friday, June 30, 2023

Health Night Out: Valley Fever – Welcome to Arizona
University of Arizona associate professor of medicine Fariba Donovan, MD, PhD, a member of the BIO5 Institute and research specialist at the Valley Fever Center for Excellence, will discuss her research into methods of early diagnosis of Valley fever on July 24, 7 p.m., in the DesertView Theatre in SaddleBrooke Ranch, off State Route 77 north of Oracle Valley at 39900 S. Clubhouse Dr., as part of the retirement community's Health Night Out lecture series.
Arizona Daily Star/Saddlebag Notes ►►►

Thursday, June 29, 2023

BBC World Service: Study suggests office workers need more sound​
Continuing coverage: A University of Arizona study on office productivity found that a noisy workplace is bad for your health, but so is a place that is extremely quiet. Report co-author Esther Sternberg, MD, research director at the University of Arizona Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine and a professor of medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, said the optimal noise level in an office comes in at about 50 decibels, comparable to moderate rain or birdsong. This story had 164 pickups. Related content.
KCLU NPR Radio Thousand Oaks, CA ►►►

Would you trust an AI doctor? University of Arizona researchers found almost half of patients would
Continuing coverage: A survey led by University of Arizona cardiologist and Regents Professor of medicine and biomedical engineering Marvin Slepian, MD, and Christopher Robertson, an adjunct professor in the James E. Rogers College of Law, finds most people – around 52% – prefer to receive their medical diagnosis and treatment from a human doctor over artificial intelligence technology. Related content.
KOLD News13 TV Tucson ►►►

Wednesday, June 28, 2023

GSA Hosts Event to Elevate Health Leadership in Federal Buildings
The U.S. General Services Administration, the nation's largest public real estate organization, provides workspace for over a million federal workers, and the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. At an event GSA hosted last month on partnerships for healthy buildings, national expert, Esther Sternberg, MD, a University of Arizona College of Medicine - Tucson professor of medicine and research director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine, presented on research efforts that show deploying health-focused building strategies advances health benefits for occupants.
Accesswire ►►►
3BL Media ►►►

Good Food, Good Health: Hacienda at the River joins with University of Arizona for Docs in the Kitchen
The Hacienda at the River has partnered with the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson to launch Docs in the Kitchen, bringing together physicians and chefs to promote healthy living through delicious, healthy meals, even for those on restricted diets. Gastroenterology Chief Juanita Merchant, MD, developed the idea and explains “when we as physicians just hand things out in clinic, patients sometimes feel like we don’t have any skin in the game. This is to show that we … understand it’s difficult to stick to these diets.”
Watermark Communities ►►►

Tuesday, June 27, 2023

UArizona building tool for more efficient skin cancer care
Ongoing coverage. An unfortunate result of Arizona’s abundant sunshine and outdoor recreation opportunities: the state has one of the highest skin cancer rates in the world. University of Arizona researchers are building a tool that could improve skin cancer care by making it more efficient. Clara N. Curiel-Lewandrowski, MD, chief of the Division of Dermatology at the College of Medicine – Tucson and co-director of the UArizona Cancer Center's Skin Cancer Institute, is quoted. Related content.
KNXV ABC15 TV Phoenix ►►►

Monday, June 26, 2023

Experts pool resources to improve skin cancer diagnostics
The Patient Registry, Imaging Database and Tissue Bank, or PRIT, represents a unique resource researchers can use to develop novel tools to help doctors diagnose and predict likely outcomes for skin cancer. Clara N. Curiel-Lewandrowski, MD, chief of the Division of Dermatology at the College of Medicine – Tucson and co-director of the UArizona Cancer Center's Skin Cancer Institute, is quoted. Related content.
KJZZ NPR Radio Phoenix ►►►
KGUN9 TV Tucson ►►►
KOLD News13 TV Tucson ►►►
Arizona Family KTVK TV3 Phoenix ►►►

Friday, June 23, 2023

UArizona Health Science doctors want to investigate long-COVID treatments
Continuing coverage. Pandemic researchers, including University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson pulmonary chief Sairam Parthasarathy, MD, principal investigator on one of 15 adult cohorts contributing to the research, are partnering with the National Institutes of Health to treat patients suffering from lasting "aftershocks" of initial COVID-19 infections. Dr. Parasarathy and the larger research team in the RECOVER initiative compiled a list of 12 key symptoms considered the most telling signs to score whether a patient has fully recovered from COVID-19. This is out of 200 symptoms patient advocacy groups have tied to long-COVID-19. "If they don't reach that score of 12 or higher, that doesn't mean they do not have long-COVID," he said. "They could still. It's just that we can't be 100% certain." Related content.
KGUN9 TV Tucson ►►►
KGUN9 TV Tucson ►►►
KOLD News13 TV Tucson ►►►
Arizona Family KTVK TV3 Phoenix ►►►

Thursday, June 22, 2023

Deadly Fungal Infections Confound Doctors—‘It’s Going to Get Worse’
One in three pneumonia cases contracted outside hospitals in Arizona is caused by Valley fever, yet patients are rarely tested for the fungal disease, which is why the Valley Fever Center for Excellence pushes for increased testing, according to Fariba Donovan, MD, PhD, a center researcher and infectious diseases associate professor in the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson.
Wall Street Journal ►►►

Buckmaster Show: Summer travel update
University of Arizona professor in the Department of Medicine and executive director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine, Victoria Maizes, MD, discusses the importance of eating a good breakfast, particularly for people with Type 2 Diabetes, and plans by the Food and Drug Administration to more closely regulate labeling on meat products regarding antibiotics.
KVOI-Radio AM1030 Tucson ►►►

Wednesday, June 21, 2023

Q&AZ: Can you get Valley fever again once you've had it?
While most people who catch Valley fever recover completely and develop an immunity to the fungal infection, researchers with the University of Arizona Valley Fever Center for Excellence, which includes College of Medicine - Tucson infectious diseases specialists Fariba Donovan, MD, PhD, and John Galgiani, MD, confirm some people, particularly those with weakened immune systems, can experience a relapse.
KJZZ-NPR Radio Phoenix ►►►

Tuesday, June 20, 2023

Inside the race to create the world's first anti-fungal vaccine
Continuing coverage: Researchers are close to developing a human vaccine for Valley fever, which is caused by the fungus Coccidioides. Valley fever only impacts a very small number of people worldwide, but it's a major public health concern locally. John Galgiani, MD, infectious diseases professor and director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence in the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted. Related content.
Inkl ►►►
Inverse ►►►

Monday, June 19, 2023

Training helps medical professionals recognize Valley fever at earlier stages
John Galgiani, MD
, infectious diseases professor and director of the UArizona Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is interviewed about how training has allowed medical professionals to treat Coccidioidomycosis (Valley fever) more effectively at early stages.
KVOI-Radio AM1030 Tucson ►►►

Saturday, June 10, 2023

‘Docs in the Kitchen’ event showcases delicious meals to manage your health
A team of University Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson physicians held the “Docs in the Kitchen” event at the retirement community Hacienda at the River to showcase delicious meals that can help manage celiac disease and other gut related issues. Attendees learned different nutritional strategies as food therapy. Participating were Gastroenterology division chief Juanita Merchant, MD, PhD (quoted); Mindy Fain, MD; David Lieberman, MD; and Kanwal Bains, MD. Related content.
KGUN9 TV Tucson ►►►
KOLD News13/KMSB Fox11 TV Tucson ►►►

Nearly 40% of cirrhosis, liver disease on TikTok contain misinformation
Continuing coverage: Although inaccurate posts about cirrhosis or liver disease were less popular, they still represented a high volume, leaving people with liver disease “susceptible to false claims,” noted Digestive Disease Week presenter. “Given the high mortality associated with liver disease, the impact of spreading inaccurate claims on such a popular social media platform could have serious clinical ramifications,” Macklin Loveland, MD, an internal medicine resident at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson, told Healio. More than 200 media outlets picked up this story.
Healio ►►►

Wednesday, June 7, 2023 

How Has Long COVID-19 Affected Sleep Patterns?
Hypersomnia, insomnia, and circadian rhythms were among sleep disorders discussed in a panel at SLEEP 2023, held in Indianapolis June 3-7, as having an association with postacute sequelae of COVID-19 (PASC), or long COVID. An estimated 6% of U.S. adults are currently experiencing symptoms of long COVID-19, according to data presented by Sairam Parthasarathy, MD, a University of Arizona professor of medicine and adult pulmonary division chief at the College of Medicine - Tucson. Related content.
American Journal of Managed Care ►►►

Monday, June 5, 2023

From sleep divorces to spray bottles — surprising sleep helpers for meno-somnia
A roundup of expert advice on how to cope with insomnia brought on by menopause. Rubin Naiman, PhD, clinical assistant professor of medicine and dream expert at the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the UArizona College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted. This story had 25 pickups.
Yahoo! Life ►►►
The Kansas City Star
(Kansas City, MO) ►►►
Fort Worth Star-Telegram (Fort Worth, TX) ►►►
Charlotte Observer (Charlotte, NC) ►►►
Lexington Herald Leader (Lexington, KY) ►►►

Sunday, June 4, 2023

HemOncToday announce 2023 Disruptive Innovators at ASCO
During the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting, Healio honored nine Healio Disruptive Innovators in hematology/oncology in its second annual award ceremony for awardees who changed the face of hematology/oncology and pushed the status quo toward the betterment of the field. Rachna Shroff, MD, MS, FASCO, interim Hematology & Oncology chief at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson, was recognized as the 2023 Woman Disrupter of the Year. She also serves on the Healio Women in Oncology board.
Healio ►►►

Large study of early-onset colorectal cancer patients IDs unique, potentially actionable mutations
Some mutational features identified in younger colorectal cancer patients deserve further study, especially since they might offer opportunities for precision treatment and underscore the need to genomically profile all early-onset colorectal cancer patients, according to a new study. Aaron J. Scott, MD, co-leader of the Clinical and Translational Oncology Program at the UArizona Cancer Center and associate professor in the Division of Hematology & Oncology at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted. 
GenomeWeb ►►►

Saturday, June 3, 2023

Arizona's rate of long COVID is higher than nation's
Continuing coverage: The above-average rate here makes sense, given Arizona’s demographics of COVID transmission and vaccination, said Sairam Parthasarathy, MD, a principal investigator for the Arizona cohort of a recent study on long COVID and chief of the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine at the University of Arizona College of Medicine. CDC data shows the national rate at 15.1% while Arizona's is 18.5%. The state had one of the highest acute COVID rates, which translates to more long COVID, Dr. Parthasarathy said. He noted a lower vaccination rate for younger adults put them at greater risk of long COVID as well. Related content.
Arizona Daily Star ►►►

Friday, June 2, 2023

The growing concern about valley fever
The fungal infection Coccidioidomycosis, known as Valley fever, is endemic to southwestern states like Arizona and California. But scientists think effects of climate change could cause it to spread to Canada and across the Great Plains by 2065. John Galgiani, MD, professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Arizona College of Medicine - Tucson and director of the UArizona Valley Fever Center for Excellence, is interviewed in this, Episode 368 of Arizona Science. 
Arizona Public Media Tucson ►►►

Thursday, June 1, 2023

University of Arizona study uncovers new details about long COVID
Continuing coverage: A new National Institutes of Health study provides an expanded working definition of "long COVID." Researchers, including University of Arizona professors and BIO5 Institute members Janko Nikolich, MD, PhD, and Sairam Parthasarathy, MD, identified 12 symptoms that most set apart those with and without the condition. Related coverage.
KTAR-Radio 92.3FM Phoenix ►►►

Wednesday, May 31, 2023

Top 10 most popular health influencers
A leader in the field of holistic health who has made significant contributions to the understanding and practice of alternative medicine, Andrew Weil, MD, professor of medicine at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson, comes in at No. 9 as a prominent physician and advocate for integrative medicine. The top three were Mehmet Oz (aka Dr. Oz), Deepak Chopra and Jillian Michaels.
Healthcare Digital ►►►

Analysis: 40% of information about liver disease on TikTok is incorrect
Continuing coverage: A study led by Macklin Loveland, MD, a internal medicine resident in the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson, finds four in 10 posts about liver disease on TikTok contain misinformation, with most of those pushing inaccurate claims about fad diets, "detox" drinks and herbal remedies. This story has had over 200 pickups by media outlets.
KBNZ TV (Bend, Oregon) ►►►

Tuesday, May 30, 2023

Effects of long COVID far worse in Arizona than other states, study shows
Continuing coverage: A new National Institutes of Health study provides an expanded working definition of "long COVID." Researchers, including University of Arizona professors and BIO5 Institute members Janko Nikolich, MD, PhD, chair, Department of Immunobiology, and Sairam Parthasarathy, MD, chief, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine, identified 12 symptoms that most set apart those with and without the condition. Related content.
Phoenix Business Journal | PDF ►►►

People still want their medical intelligence in human form
Continuing coverage: A survey led by University of Arizona Regents Professor of Biomedical Engineering Marvin Slepian, MD, JD (member, Division of Cardiology and Sarver Heart Center), and Christopher Robertson, an adjunct professor in the James E. Rogers College of Law, finds most people – around 52% – prefer to receive their medical diagnosis and treatment from a human doctor over artificial intelligence technology. Related content.
Medscape | PDF ►►► 

Saturday, May 26, 2023

Worried you may have long COVID? Here are the top 12 symptoms
Continuing coverage: A new National Institutes of Health study provides an expanded working definition of "long COVID." Researchers, including University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson professors and BIO5 Institute members Janko Nikolich, MD, PhD, and Sairam Parthasarathy, MD, identified 12 symptoms that most set apart those with and without the condition. "This is a good start so that we can use this as the basis for future research to identify what are the things that cause long COVID, what are the things that can treat it," Dr. Parthasarathy said. Related content.
Arizona Republic ►►►
Arizona Republic (PDF) ►►►
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Thursday, May 25, 2023

UArizona Health Sciences study uncovers new details about long COVID
Continuing coverage: A new National Institutes of Health study provides an expanded working definition of long COVID. UArizona Health Sciences researchers lead one of 15 adult cohorts that contributed to the research. Sairam Parthasarathy, MD, one of the principal investigators for the Arizona cohort, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine in the Department of Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, and Janko Nikolich, MD, PhD, contact principal investigator for the Arizona cohort, director of the Aegis Consortium at UArizona Health Sciences and professor and head of the Department of Immunobiology at the College of Medicine – Tucson, are quoted. Related content. This story has had more than 245 pickups.
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How to prevent tick bites from happening, and what to do if you get one
Andrew Weil, MD, founder and director of the University of Arizona Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine, which also functions as the Division of Integrative Medicine in the Department of Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, explains why prompt treatment for tick bites is essential to avoid complications that can last for years.
Prevention ►►►

Wednesday, May 24, 2023

Dr. Weil offers his 'conspiracy theory' for better sleep
University of Arizona professor of public health Andrew Weil, MD, founder and director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine, delivered a keynote address at the bedding industry's annual conference last week at the J.W. Marriott Starr Pass Resort.
Designers Today ►►►
Furniture Today ►►►

Survey: People split on whether to trust AIs in medicine
Continuing coverage: A survey led by University of Arizona researchers finds around 52% of people would prefer a human doctor over artificial intelligence technology for diagnosis and treatment. University of Arizona Regents Professor Marvin Slepian, MD, JD, a member of the Sarver Heart Center and the Division of Cardiology in the College of Medicine - Tucson's Department of Medicine, led the research along with Christopher Robertson, an adjunct professor in the James E. Rogers College of Law. Related content.
KJZZ 91.5FM (NPR) Phoenix ►►►

Tuesday, May 23, 2023

These Arizona scientists had the most impactful COVID research
A review of COVID-related research generated by scientists from Arizona universities finds the University of Arizona led the way with 21 studies in the top 50. Of those studies, six papers cited – numbers 8, 12, 20, 37, 44 and 50 – involved multiple Department of Medicine research faculty and staff in the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson.
Arizona Family (KPHO CBS5/KTVK-3TV) Phoenix ►►►

Not feeling well? Would you trust an AI doctor?
Continuing coverage: A survey led by University of Arizona researchers finds around 52% of people would prefer a human doctor over artificial intelligence technology for diagnosis and treatment. "I really feel this study has the import for national reach. It will guide many future studies and clinical translational decisions even now," said University of Arizona Regents Professor Marvin Slepian, MD, JD. Slepian, a member of the Sarver Heart Center and the Division of Cardiology in the College of Medicine - Tucson's Department of Medicine, led the research along with Christopher Robertson, an adjunct professor in the James E. Rogers College of Law. Related content.
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AI in Healthcare/Health Exec ►►►
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DF Blog ►►►

Monday, May 22, 2023

UArizona researchers find Americans are split on trusting AI with health care
A study found that Americans are split on whether they can trust artificial intelligence technology in their health care. The research team found that most patients aren’t convinced the diagnoses provided by AI are as trustworthy of those delivered by human medical professionals. Marvin J. Slepian, MD, JD, Regents Professor of Medicine in the Division of Cardiology at the UArizona College of Medicine – Tucson and a member of the Sarver Heart Center, is quoted. Related content.
Medical Xpress ►►►
Futurity ►►►
KGUN9-TV Tucson ►►►
Daily Advent ►►►

Sleep apnea raises risk of long COVID by up to 75% for some, study says
Updated coverage: A new analysis of electronic health data on nearly 1.8 million adults finds those with obstructive sleep apnea are 75% more likely to develop long COVID after a SARS-CoV-2 infection, on average, than people without the condition. "Research needs to be done to verify this association," said UArizona professor of medicine and pulmonary chief Sairam Parthasarathy, MD, who was not involved in the study. "It is important to note some symptoms of long COVID such as fatigue may be related to obstructive sleep apnea and treatment of that may improve long COVID-related symptoms."
CNN ►►►

Friday, May 20, 2023

Scientists have discovered why we wake up earlier as we get older
Continuing coverage: Experts say, as we age, our bodies change internally and externally, altering our sleep patterns. For a younger person, dinner may help the brain understand bedtime is in a few hours. For those older, this connection may not happen. "Wiring of the brain is likely not sensing... and responding as well as it should because it's an aging brain," said Dr. Sairam Parthasarathy, director, University of Arizona Health Sciences Center for Sleep, Circadian Rhythm & Neuroscience Research, and adult pulmonary chief, College of Medicine – Tucson. These inputs include sunset, sunlight, meals, social cues and physical activity to mark where we are in a day. Related content.
Indy100/The Independent (UK) ►►►
MSN (UK) ►►►

Thursday, May 18, 2023

Analysis: 40% of information about liver disease on TikTok is incorrect
Continuing coverage: A study led by Dr. Macklin Loveland, an internal medicine resident at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson, finds four in 10 posts about liver disease on TikTok contain misinformation, with most of those pushing inaccurate claims about fad diets, "detox" drinks and herbal remedies.
Healio ►►►

Wednesday, May 17, 2023

Analysis: 40% of information about liver disease on TikTok is incorrect
Continuing coverage: A study led by Dr. Macklin Loveland, an internal medicine resident in the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson, finds four in 10 posts about liver disease on TikTok contain misinformation, with most of those pushing inaccurate claims about fad diets, "detox" drinks and herbal remedies.
MDEdge/Internal Medicine News ►►►

Tuesday, May 16, 2023

How obesity and metabolic health can impact your cancer risk
New research shows metabolically healthy and unhealthy forms of obesity are linked to a greater risk of developing obesity-related cancers. Jennifer W. Bea, PhD, associate professor of medicine in the UArizona College of Medicine – Tucson and co-leader of the cancer prevention and control program in the UArizona Cancer Center, is quoted.
Healthline ►►►

TikTok hosts the latest dance moves and bad information on liver disease
Continuing coverage: Four in 10 posts about liver disease on TikTok contain misinformation, with most pushing inaccurate claims about fad diets, "detox" drinks and herbal remedies, according to a study being presented today at the Digestive Disease Week 2023 conference. Macklin Gardner Loveland, MD, the study's lead author and an internal medicine resident at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted.
WebMD ►►►

Monday, May 15, 2023

UArizona Health Sciences unveils new sleep research facility
Continuing coverage: UArizona Health Sciences is opening the doors to its new Center for Sleep, Circadian and Neuroscience Research facility, led by Sairam Parthasarathy, MD, center director and pulmonary division chief at the UArizona College of Medicine – Tucson. The new facility, built using a $5 million construction grant from the National Institutes of Health Office of the Director, will give investigators access to state-of-the-art technology to conduct innovative sleep and circadian rhythm research. Related content.
KVOA News4 TV Tucson ►►►
KGUN9 TV Tucson ►►►
KOLD News13 TV Tucson ►►►

UArizona center promotes awareness, education during Arthritis Awareness Month
May is National Arthritis Awareness Month, and supporters of the UArizona Arthritis Center are intent on promoting awareness — and increasing funding — for all things arthritis, including research, education and training of future rheumatologists. C. Kent Kwoh, MD, director of the UArizona Arthritis Center and chief of the Division of Rheumatology in the UArizona College of Medicine – Tucson’s Department of Medicine, is quoted.
Arizona Daily Star ►►►

Study sheds light on how Valley fever spreads
Coccidioidomycosis (Valley fever), which traditionally afflicts patients in Arizona, has started spreading to places as far away as Washington state. John Galgiani, MD, professor of infectious diseases and director of the UArizona Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the UArizona College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted.  
KPNX 12TV Phoenix ►►►

Friday, May 12, 2023

Sleep apnea raises risk of long Covid by up to 75% for some, study says
Adults with obstructive sleep apnea have up to a 75% increased risk, on average, of developing long Covid after a SARS-CoV-2 infection compared with people without sleep apnea, a new study found. Sairam Parthasarathy, MD, a principal investigator of the UArizona Health Sciences RECOVER Adult Study, professor of medicine and pulmonary division chief at the UArizona College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted.
The Mercury News (San Jose, CA) ►►► 
East Bay Times (Walnut Creek, CA) ►►►

Thursday, May 11, 2023

Sleep apnea raises risk of long Covid by up to 75% for some, study says
Adults with obstructive sleep apnea have up to a 75% increased risk, on average, of developing long Covid after a SARS-CoV-2 infection compared with people without sleep apnea, a new study found. Sairam Parthasarathy, MD, a principal investigator of the UArizona Health Sciences RECOVER Adult Study, professor of medicine and pulmonary division chief at the UArizona College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted.
CNN ►►►

Wednesday, May 10, 2023

What’s new with Valley fever in Arizona for 2023?
If you’re among the tens of thousands of people who've migrated to Arizona in recent years, then you may not have heard of Valley fever. And if you’re a native Arizonan or Californian, you might wonder: “what’s new with Valley fever?” Currently, the University of Arizona, Northern Arizona University and Arizona State University are partnering on ongoing research for Valley fever. John Galgiani, MD, a professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases in the UArizona College of Medicine – Tucson's Department of Medicine and director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence, leads the research team focused on preventing the fungal disease, by singling out hotspots by genetic cluster and vaccine development.
AZ Big Media ►►►

Tuesday, May 9, 2023

TikTok hosts the latest dance moves and bad information on liver disease
Four in 10 posts about liver disease on TikTok contain misinformation, with most pushing inaccurate claims about fad diets, "detox" drinks and herbal remedies, according to a study being presented today at the Digestive Disease Week 2023 conference. Macklin Gardner Loveland, MD, the study's lead author and an internal medicine resident at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted. This story had more than 200 pickups by media outlets.
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Drugs.com ►►►
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Guam Pacific Daily News ►►►

Experts in Valley fever say testing has improved, likely a factor in cases increasing
The Arizona Department of Health Services is reporting a rise in Valley fever. In 2020 and again in 2021, it reported around 11,500 confirmed cases. The last time cases were that high was in 2012. John Galgiani, MD, adult infectious diseases professor in the UArizona College of Medicine - Tucson's Department of Medicine and director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence, is quoted.
Arizona Family  (3TV/CBS 5) Phoenix ►►►

Monday, May 8, 2023

Arizona and Alzheimer’s disease: Time is not on our side
Lisa M. O'Neill, DBH, MPH
, UArizona Center on Aging associate director of research and education and clinical assistant professor of medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, and Mindy Fain, MD, center co-director, professor and chief, Division of General Internal Medicine, Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, write an opinion piece about the importance of early diagnoses of Alzheimer's disease and dementia.
Arizona Daily Star ►►►

Expert point of view: Rachna T. Shroff, MD
The addition of the checkpoint inhibitor pembrolizumab to chemotherapy with cisplatin/gemcitabine as first-line therapy improved overall survival in patients with advanced biliary tract cancer, according to results of the KEYNOTE-966 trial. Rachna Shroff, MD, MS, interim chief, Division of Hematology and Oncology, associate dean of clinical and translational research and associate professor in the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted.
The ASCO Post ►►►

Sunday, May 7, 2023

Ginny Clements reflects on life after $8.5M contribution to the University of Arizona*
University of Arizona Cancer Center donor Ginny Clements discusses her experience with breast cancer and how that motivated her $8.5 million gift to the university three years ago which established the breast cancer research institute named for her. Related content.
KYMA-TV Yuma, AZ ►►►

Friday, May 5, 2023

Ginny Clements reflects on life after $8.5M contribution to the University of Arizona*
University of Arizona Cancer Center donor Ginny Clements discusses her experience with breast cancer and how that motivated her $8.5 million gift to the university three years ago which established the breast cancer research institute named for her. Related content.
KGUN9-TV Tucson ►►►
Yahoo News ►►►
WKRC-TV (Cincinnati, OH) ►►►
WFTV-News
(Philadelphia, PA) ►►►

Why is Himalayan pink salt pink, and why do we care?
Himalayan pink salt has exploded in popularity, being touted as everything from a tastier or healthier version of regular salt to an honest-to-goodness miracle panacea. The truth is far more complex. Andrew Weil, MD, founder and director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted. The center is the operational arm of the Division of Integrative Medicine in the Department of Medicine.
IFL Science ►►►

Thursday, May 4, 2023

Phase III immunotherapy trials offer hope for patients with lung, liver and biliary tract cancers
The incidence of biliary tract cancers, a group of rare and aggressive cancers that arise from the bile ducts and gall bladder, are on the rise and typically have a poor prognosis, according to a report presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2023 in Orlando, Florida. Rachna Shroff, MD, MS, associate professor and interim division chief of Hematology & Oncology and associate dean of clinical and translational research in the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted.
American Association for Cancer Research ►►►

University of Arizona Arthritis Center virtual symposium to be held on Saturday, May 6
The 2023 UArizona Arthritis Center virtual symposium takes place Saturday, 9 a.m-12:30 p.m. It's held every May, which marks National Arthritis Awareness Month. Melanie Hingle, PhD, associate professor of nutritional sciences and wellness at the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences and Mel & Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, will deliver the keynote address. The center, led by C. Kent Kwoh, MD, acts as the operational arm of the Division of Rheumatology in the College of Medicine - Tucson's Department of Medicine.
KGUN9-TV Tucson ►►►

Tuesday, May 2, 2023

Why you wake up earlier as you get older
As we age, our bodies change both internally and externally, which is a major factor behind the sleep changes that come later in life. Sairam Parthasarathy, MD, pulmonary division chief at the UArizona College of Medicine - Tucson and director of the UArizona Health Sciences Center for Sleep, Circadian and Neuroscience Research, is quoted.
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Monday, April 24, 2023

Five more unique electives for residency
The story suggests medical residents consider the Integrative Medicine Elective Rotation at the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson. Among its research, teaching and clinical operations, the center also functions as the Division of Integrative Medicine in the college's Department of Medicine.
The DO ►►►

Thursday, April 20, 2023

The devil lurking in the dust
Efforts to develop a cure for Valley fever could involve use of live attenuated vaccines, which elicit a robust immune response – including T cells – but also run the risk of replicating uncontrollably in people who are immunocompromised. Preventing that is now possible. John Galgiani, MD, College of Medicine infectious diseases professor and director of the UArizona Valley Fever Center for Excellence, is quoted. Related content.
Globe World Echo News (London, UK) ►►►
Vox ►►►

Fast five quiz: Advanced and metastatic breast cancer myths
Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed female cancer worldwide. Encouragingly, new therapeutic options are continuously emerging, which in most cases are tailored according to the specific subtype of breast cancer. Pavani Chalasani, MD, MPH, associate professor in Division of Hematology and Oncology at the College of Medicine – Tucson and UArizona Cancer Center, is lead author.
Medscape ►►►

Wednesday, April 19, 2023

Buckmaster Show: Ways to cope with seasonal allergies
Victoria Maizes, MD
, executive director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine and chief of the Division of Integrative Medicine in the Department of Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, discusses remedies that can help with seasonal allergies on the Bill Buckmaster Show.
KVOI-Radio AM1030 Tucson ►►►

Tuesday, April 18, 2023

HIV vaccine research ‘at a crossroads’ after recent failures
There are no HIV vaccines currently available, and after the recent failures of three experimental vaccines in development, there are now zero candidates in late-stage trials. Elizabeth Connick, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases in the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted.
Healio ►►►

Reduced CC16 concentrations in bronchial epithelial cells linked to asthma severity
Patients with severe asthma vs. nonsevere asthma vs. healthy controls had lower club cell secretory protein-16 (CC16) mRNA expression levels, according to study published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. Xingnan Li, PhD, associate professor of medicine at the UArizona College of Medicine – Tucson, said, “In this study of nonsmokers with asthma, T2 inflammation may reduce CC16 mRNA expression levels in bronchial epithelial cells, which are associated with asthma susceptibility, severity and exacerbations. Thus, CC16 might be a nontraditional T2 biomarker for respiratory diseases.”
Healio ►►►

Ailments may be due to lack of dreams rather than lack of sleep
Multiple modern ailments may be caused by dream deprivation, not sleep deprivation. Rubin Naiman, PhD, clinical assistant professor of medicine and dream expert at the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine, which operates as the Division of Integrative Medicine in the Department of Medicine, is interviewed. 
WAKM-Radio (Franklin, TN) ►►►

Saturday, April 15, 2023

Warmer weather brings increase in allergies
Warmer weather following a wet winter means suffering for people with allergies as those conditions prompt plants to produce pollen in vaster quantities than they otherwise might. Tara Carr, MD, associate professor at the College of Medicine – Tucson and an allergist in the Department of Medicine's Pulmonary Division, is quoted. 
KOLD News13 TV Tucson ►►►

Thursday, April 13, 2023

Banner – University Medicine North Clinic to offer free head and neck cancer screenings
The University of Arizona Cancer Center is offering free head-and-neck cancer screenings Saturday, April 15. The event includes demonstrations and education.
KGUN9 TV Tucson ►►►

Wednesday, April 12, 2023

Long COVID is already having a massive impact on the health care system
An interview with Sairam Parthasarathy, MD, professor of medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson and director of UArizona Health Sciences Center for Sleep and Circadian Sciences, is part of Researching COVID-19 to Enhance Recovery, or the RECOVER Initiative. Related content.
KJZZ Radio Phoenix ►►►

Tuesday, April 11, 2023

Badge-eligible schools: Best medical schools 2023-2024
A listing of the top medical schools includes the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson, which made the list for several categories including primary care, research, health professional shortage areas, rural, primary care measure and diversity index.
U.S. News & World Report ►►►

Friday, April 7, 2023

Does mind-body therapy for inflammatory bowel disease help patients?
Psychological stress has long been suspected as a key factor in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease and may represent a key trigger for symptom flares. Andrew Weil, MD, founder and director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, is listed as a resource.
Neurology Advisors ►►►

Wednesday, April 6, 2023

The 20 best places to live if you have arthritis
Tucson ranks as the fifth-best place in the U.S. to live for people with arthritis, largely due to the excellence of the rheumatologists at the College of Medicine – Tucson and the presence of the UArizona Arthritis Center, the research and outreach arm of the Division of Rheumatology, both headed by C. Kent Kwoh, MD.
MoneyInc ►►►

Thursday, March 30, 2023

Drug-resistant fungal infection surging across the US, cases in Arizona hospitals and nursing homes
Continuing coverage: Candida auris, a dangerous multi-drug-resistant fungus, is rapidly spreading in hospitals across the nation. Saman Nematollahi, MD, assistant professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted.
KTCC-TV (Rochester, MN) ►►► 
KPNX-TV Phoenix ►►► 
KWCH-TV/KSCW-TV (Wichita, KS) ►►►

Wednesday, March 29, 2023

New drug combination holds hope for some cancer patients
A new combination drug treatment showed promising results in HPV-negative patients with pan-refractory, recurrent metastatic head and neck cancer, according to a study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. The study was funded through the investigator-sponsored trials program of Aveo Oncology and supported by the shared resources of the UArizona Cancer Center.
Medical Dialogues ►►►

Tuesday, March 28, 2023

Drug-resistant fungal infection surging across the US, cases in Arizona hospitals and nursing homes
A dangerous, multi-drug-resistant fungus candida auris is rapidly spreading in hospitals nationwide, with reported cases tripling in three years. "The reason this has become such a serious global public health threat is that it's become resistant to several classes of antifungals," said Saman Nematollahi, MD, UArizona College of Medicine – Tucson assistant professor of medicine. John Galgiani, MD, Valley Fever Center for Excellence director, also quoted in some stories on this topic.
KOLD/KMSB-TV Tucson ►►►
KOLD-TV Tucson ►►►
Someone Somewhere ►►►

Monday, March 27, 2023

Prevent cognitive decline by avoiding these top foods
Continuing coverage: Andrew Weil, MD, professor of medicine and founding director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, discusses diet and gut health.
The School of Greatness Podcast ►►►

$10.8M initiative unites engineering and health researchers to improve cancer treatments
Continuing coverage: The UArizona Cancer Engineering Initiative, a collaboration between the UArizona Cancer Center and the College of Engineering, received $10.8 million in New Economy Initiative funding to create humanlike cancer models and growth environments to help improve prevention, diagnosis and treatment. Related content.
OncLive ►►►

Saturday, March 25, 2023

Bacteria from meat may cause more than a half-million UTIs, study says
Continuing coverage: Infectious-disease specialists repeatedly warn of dangers of indiscriminate use of antibiotics in food animals, a practice contributing to bacterial strains that don't respond to traditional treatments. Now a new study estimates foodborne E. coli strains are likely to cause more than a half-million urinary tract infections annually in the U.S. Elizabeth Connick, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases in the College of Medicine – Tucson, wasn't involved in the study but is quoted.
Live Science ►►►
MSN UK ►►►

Thursday, March 23, 2023

Bacteria from meat may cause more than a half-million UTIs, study says
Infectious-disease specialists have warned repeatedly of dangers of overuse of antibiotics in food animals, a practice that contributes to development of bacterial strains that don't respond to traditional treatments. Now a new study estimates foodborne E. coli strains are likely to cause more than a half-million urinary tract infections annually in the U.S. Elizabeth Connick, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases in the College of Medicine – Tucson, was not involved in the study and is quoted.  
Washington Post ►►►
San Francisco Chronicle ►►►

Monday, March 13, 2023

True Food Kitchen celebrates 15 years with a new location in Century City
True Food Kitchen opened in Phoenix 15 years ago with a menu based on a world-renowned anti-inflammatory diet developed by Andrew T. Weil, MD, director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson. The restaurant will open its 44th location in May at the Westfield Century City Mall.
LA Weekly ►►►

Pair of Arizona medical startups win federal grants to advance toward commercialization
Continuing coverage: Metfora has announced an award to pursue the detection of chronic diseases via multiplex analysis of circulating metabolites. The diagnostic technology was originally developed by Division of Endocrinology associate professors Ruslan Rafikov, PhD, and Olga Rafikova, MD, PhD. Related content.
Business Journals ►►►

COVID experts today: Eating out, masking less, even booking cruises
Continuing coverage: A group of medical experts have been interviewed several times over the past three years to see how the pandemic has affected their personal lives. While the pandemic isn’t gone, their risk calculations these days look different. Elizabeth Connick, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases in the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted. 
Becker's Hospital Review ►►►

Sunday, March 12, 2023

Covid experts today: Eating out, masking less, even booking cruises
For some, life is back to normal. Others are still cautious. Many have had covid. All are vaccinated. UArizona chief of adult infectious diseases Elizabeth Connick, MD, says, “We all have moments where we forget covid exists, when we want to enjoy a moment without thinking about it… but I don’t think it’s back to the way it used to be.”
Washington Post ►►►
Becker's Hospital Review ►►►

Thursday, March 9, 2023

Startup Metfora to advance development of AI-enabled diagnostic technology
Metfora has announced an award to pursue the detection of chronic diseases via multiplex analysis of circulating metabolites. The diagnostic technology was originally developed by Division of Endocrionology associate professors Ruslan Rafikov, PhD, and Olga Rafikova, MD, PhD. Related content.
Real Estate Daily News ►►►

Monday, March 6, 2023

Office space designs could help boost employees' mental health, study shows how
Continuing coverage: A recent study published in the Journal of Research in Personality found that office space designs have a bearing on workers' career satisfaction and performance. Esther Sternberg, MD, Division of Integrative Medicine professor and director of research for the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, co-authored the study and is quoted. Related content.
Medical Daily ►►►
Inverse ►►►

Monday, February 27, 2023

'The Last of Us' gets one thing right about fungi and climate change
Continuing coverage: Thanks to a hit new HBO show, people are very concerned about Valley fever and studies show variable weather caused by climate change could spread Valley fever to other parts of the country. Infectious diseases professor John Galgiani, MD, director of the UArizona Valley Fever Center for Excellence, is quoted.
Inverse ►►►

Sunday, February 26, 2023

Bruce Willis' frontotemporal dementia diagnosis reveals an uncomfortable truth
Linda Phillips, PhD, RN
, professor at the College of Medicine – Tucson and senior director of research and innovation for the Arizona Center on Aging, and Mindy Fain, MD, professor at the College of Medicine – Tucson and co-director of the Arizona Center on Aging, co-authored an opinion piece about the importance of caregivers and the need for for federal programs like Medicare to be adapted to better address the needs of those living with progressive chronic illnesses.
MSNBC ►►►

Wednesday, February 15, 2023

Buckmaster Show: Dark chocolate red flags
Victoria Maizes, MD
, executive director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, discusses how a workplace can influence physical and mental health, and red flags that are popping up in research about consuming dark chocolate.
KVOA Radio 1030AM Tucson ►►►

Tuesday, February 14, 2023

UArizona program works to diversify workforce on aging
A new program at the Arizona Center on Aging, co-led by Mindy Fain, MD, chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine, Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, aims to increase the number of researchers trained to study older adults with the goal of improving the well-being of older adults in diverse groups
KOLD-TV Tucson ►►►

Friday, February 10, 2023

Fungal infections are becoming more common. Why isn't there a vaccine?
In Arizona, researchers are focused on developing a vaccine to prevent Valley fever, a lung infection caused by the fungus Coccidioides, historically found in hot, dry soils of the Southwest. So far, the vaccine is effective in dogs, said John Galgiani, MD, director of the University of Arizona Valley Fever Center for Excellence...
​NBC News ►►► 
Becker's Hospital Review ►►► 
Dallas Executive News ►► ► 
Nouvelles-du-Monde
(France) ►► ► 

Thursday, February 9, 2023

Doctors warn of increased risk of heart attack during Super Bowl
With Super Bowl LVII just days away, some Arizona doctors are asking viewers to monitor their stress levesl to decrease the risk of a heart attack. J.R. Exequiel Pineda, MD, PhD, an interventionist cardiologist at the University of Arizona Sarver Heart Center, is quoted.
KOLD-TV Tucson ►►►

Valley fever, historically a Southwest fungal infection, may be spreading
Scientists predict that Valley fever, caused by inhaled Coccioides fungal spores endemic to soils of the U.S. Southwest, may begin to expand its borders due to changing weather patterns. John Galgiani, MD, a professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases and founding director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence, at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted.
Health ►► ►

Wednesday, February 8, 2023

How the U.S. Can Get Ahead of a Spreading Disease Caused by Fungal Spores
Director of the UArizona Valley Fever Center for Excellence and Professor of Medicine John Galgiani, MD, featured in story...
Rolling Stone ►►► 

Tuesday, February 7, 2023

What can be learned from negative findings of two trials in biliary tract cancer
Two recent clinical trials investigating new ways to treat biliary cancer failed to meet their primary endpoints, but investigators believe the studies had a positive impact in the space of biliary tract cancer research. Rachna Shroff, MD, MS, a UArizona Cancer Center researcher and interim chief of the Division of Hematology and Oncology at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is quoted. 
The ASCO Post ►►►

Monday, February 6, 2023

New Valley fever training is changing medical care and saving lives
A training program developed by Banner – University Medicine and the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the College of Medicine – Tucson seeks to catch Valley fever before it turns deadly. Center Director John Galgiani, MD, a professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the College of Medicine – Tucson and Phoenix, is quoted.
KOLD-TV 13News Tucson ►►►

Saturday, February 4, 2023

SWOG 1815 Biomarker Analyses May Identify Biliary Tract Cancer Subsets Who Could Benefit From Nab-Paclitaxel Triplet
University of Arizona Cancer Center's Rachna T. Shroff, MD, MS, also Division of Hematology & Oncology chief in the Department of Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, expands on the rationale for evaluating the addition of nab-paclitaxel to gemcitabine/cisplatin in patients with newly diagnosed biliary tract cancers, data presented from SWOG 1815, and how this study may pave the way for future research efforts in the paradigm.
OncLive ►►►

Friday, February 3, 2023

Key to healthier employees might be quieter or louder office space: study
A recent study conducted by scientists at the Universities of Arizona and Kansas suggest that working at a busy coffee shop may be healthier than doing so in a quiet office. Esther Sternberg, MD, professor of medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson and director of research for the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine, co-authored the study and is quoted. Related content.
Kansas City Post ►►► 
Jerusalem Post (Israel) ►►► 
Salt Lake City Sun ►►► 
Milwaukee News ►►► 
ANI (India) ►►►

What’s new in cholangiocarcinoma: Updates from the annual American Gastrointestinal Cancer Symposium
Rachna Shroff, MD, MS
, associate dean for clinical and translational research at the College of Medicine – Tucson, interim Hematology-Oncology Division chief and UArizona Cancer Center associate director of clinical investigations, provides updates from the symposium, including the latest on cholangiocarcinoma research and treatment. 
Medscape ►►►  

New UArizona College of Medicine – Tucson program aims to boost number of researchers studying older adults and well-being
A new program at the Center on Aging, co-led by Mindy Fain, MD, who's also chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine, Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, aims to increase the number of researchers trained to study older adults with the goal of improving their well-being in diverse groups. 
KNAU-FM Public Radio Flagstaff, AZ ►►►

Thursday, February 2, 2023

Should you be worried about infection from eye drops?
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently urged consumers to stop using EzriCare after it was linked to bacterial infections from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Elizabeth Connick, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases in the College of Medicine – Tucson, said the bacteria can impair vision and cause blindness...
Washington Post ►►►
Star Tribune (Minneapolis, MN) ►►►

Wednesday, February 1, 2023

Valley fever sparks fears as experts warn deadly fungal infection that kills 1 in 100 sufferers may spread to 17 states
A story about Valley fever mentions that researchers at the College of Medicine – Tucson have developed a vaccine that’s highly effective in dogs and references information from the UArizona Valley Fever Center for Excellence, led by John Galgiani, MD, a professor of infectious diseases at the College of Medicine – Tucson and Phoenix.
USA Today ►►► 
The U.S. Sun ►►►

Tuesday, January 31, 2023

Valley fever, historically found only in the Southwest, is spreading. It can have devastating consequences.
Scientists have been trying to develop a vaccine for Valley fever since 1960. In recent years, researchers at the College of Medicine – Tucson have developed a vaccine that’s highly effective in dogs. John Galgiani, MD, infectious diseases professor and director of the college’s Valley Fever Center for Excellence, is quoted. 
NBC News ►►►

Thursday, January 26, 2023

Could natural medicines save the health care system?
An interview with Andrew Weil, MD, professor of medicine and founding director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, discusses how natural medicine and an integrative approach could help control costs and improve the health care system. 
The Epoch Times ►►►

Wednesday, January 25, 2023

Buckmaster Show: How micro-workouts help your health
Victoria Maizes, MD
, a professor of medicine and executive director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, discusses how “awe” triggers positive psychological responses in the body and how brief bursts of activity, or micro-workouts, could be a substantial health benefit. 
KVOI-Radio AM1030 Tucson ►►► 

Friday, January 20, 2023

No survival benefit for nab-paclitaxel in biliary tract cancer
Rachna Shroff, MD, MS
, associate dean for clinical and translational research in the College of Medicine – Tucson, interim chief of the Division of Hematology and Oncology, and UArizona Cancer Center associate director of clinical investigations, led the first randomized phase 3 clinical trial to be conducted in the U.S. in biliary tract cancers. 
Mirage News ►►►

Thursday, January 19, 2023

Dr. James Liao Named Department Chair at University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson
University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine cardiology chief James K. Liao, MD, was named chair of the Department of Medicine at the College of Medicine – Tucson, effective Jan. 16, 2023. This content originated with a UArizona Health Sciences news release.
BizTUCSON ►►►
WittKeiffer ►►►

Tuesday, January 17, 2023

Improving Adult Immunization Rates Focus of Partnership Between ATS and Three Health Systems Across U.S.
The American Thoracic Society is starting the new year poised to improve vaccination rates with three health system partners: University of Arizona/Banner Health; West Virginia University Hospitals Inc.; and San Francisco Health Network/University of California. Each health system will prioritize vaccine rates among high-risk adults with lung disease across different populations. Sai Parthasarathy, MD, UArizona College of Medicine – Tucson adult pulmonary division chief, is quoted.
Newswise ►►►

Monday, January 16, 2023

Is gluten bad for you? Here’s what Dr. Weil thinks
Andrew Weil, MD
, professor of medicine and founding director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, writes that a gluten-free diet is critical for people with celiac disease and might benefit those who believe they have nonceliac gluten sensitivity, but there’s no reason to sun gluten otherwise. 
Prevention ►►►

Sunday, January 15, 2023

How to give your body’s natural detox system the daily support it needs
Detoxification pathways are important not only to buffer against environmental factors, toxins and stressors, but also to help achieve homeostatic antioxidant-versus-oxidant balance in the body on a daily basis. Lise Alschuler, ND, FABNO, professor of clinical medicine at the University of Arizona, is quoted. 
MindBodyGreen ►►►

Thursday, January 12, 2023

Which noted doctor did Purecare turn to for its new product collaboration?
Purecare partnered with Andrew Weil, MD, professor of medicine and founding director of the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in the College of Medicine – Tucson, to develop a new, comprehensive collection of sleep accessories that feature natural materials, chemical-free dyes and a sustainability story. 
Furniture Today ►►►

Tuesday, January 10, 2023

How to perform CPR
The Sarver Heart Center in the UArizona College of Medicine – Tucson is mentioned in a story on its pioneering research related to cardiopulmonary resuscitation and how to administer CPR in adults, teens, children and infants, when to give mouth-to-mouth, and how to use a defibrillator. 
NBC’s Today Show ►►►

January 6, 2023

Does chemotherapy impact COVID-19 vaccine protection?
Studies, including one from the UArizona Cancer Center, have shown that COVID-19 vaccines might not be as effective in people who are receiving cancer treatment. Among Department of Medicine co-authors of the UArizona paper published in Nature Medicine are Aaron Scott, MD, Pavani Chalasani, MD, and first-author Rachna Shroff, MD, MS, interim chief of the Division of Hematology and Oncology, Cancer Center associate director of clinical investigations and associate dean for clinical and translational research at the College of Medicine - Tucson. 
Healthnews ►►►

Thursday, September 1, 2022

Parthasarathy ernannte uns alle zum Arizona Health Champion für August
Sairam Parthasarathy, MD, professor of medicine in College of Medicine – Tucson and director of UArizona Health Sciences Center for Sleep and Circadian Sciences, was recognized as the August Arizona Health Champion by All of Us University of Arizona-Banner Health. This content originated with a Health Sciences news release. 
Nach Welt (Germany) ►►►

Monday, August 29, 2022

Sweitzer named vice chair of clinical research in medicine
Nancy K. Sweitzer, MD, PhD, a professor of medicine, cardiology division chief and Sarver Heart Center director at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson, has been named vice chair of clinical research for the Department of Medicine and director of clinical research for the Cardiovascular Division at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
The Source ►►►

Tuesday, June 7, 2022

A new pathway for preventing dementia?
Society for Vascular Surgery member and University of Arizona Sarver Heart Center member Craig Weinkauf, MD, is leading a trial looking into a connection between Alzheimer’s and carotid stenosis. "We want to try to quantify the brain: volumes, structural connectivity, functional connectivity and other relevant findings associated with neurodegeneration," he says.
Vascular Specialists ►►►

Thursday, April 28, 2022

COVID-19 Research Initiative Reaches Out to Minorities
Sairam Parthasarathy, MD
, pulmonary division chief, critical care specialist and professor at the College of Medicine – Tucson, is leading the Community Engagement Alliance (CEAL) Against COVID-19 Disparities. The primary goal is to reach, educate and create trust with communities that are disproportionately affected by the pandemic. Related content.
KGUN9-TV Tucson ►►►

Wednesday, January 26, 2022

George Washington University Picks Dr. Julie E. Bauman as Cancer Center Director
The George Washington University announced that Julie E. Bauman, MD, MPH, will join its academic medical enterprise to serve as the director of the GW Cancer Center. Dr. Bauman is currently a professor of medicine, chief of hematology/oncology, medical director of oncology services and deputy director of the University of Arizona Cancer Center at the College of Medicine – Tucson.
GW Today ►►►

Monday, January 24, 2022

Heart Failure Society of America Reviews Growing Economic Burden of Heart Failure in U.S.
The review, in the Journal of Cardiac Failure, examines growing expenses for patients and the U.S. health care system, providing a summary of evidence for the cost-effectiveness of drugs, devices, diagnostic tests, hospital care, and transitions of care for patients with heart failure. Cardiology chief and Sarver Heart Center director Nancy Sweitzer, MD, PhD, is cited as one of review authors.
WKBN 27 News (Youngstown, OH) ►►►

Can mRNA Vaccines Help Treat Cancer?
People worldwide have received mRNA vaccines that provide powerful protection against severe COVID-19 caused by infection with SARS-CoV-2. For more than a decade, cancer researchers have been developing similar treatments known as a personalized cancer vaccine with various technologies, including mRNA and protein fragments or peptides. Julie Bauman, MD, MPH, UArizona professor of medicine, hematology/oncology division chief and Cancer Center deputy director, is quoted.
Cancer Health ►►►

Monday, January 3, 2022

Q&A: Does asthma mitigate the risk for COVID-19?
In an interview with Healio, Monica Kraft, MD, Robert and Irene Flinn endowed chair in medicine at UArizona College of Medicine – Tucson and deputy director of the Asthma and Airway Disease Research Center, discussed what's known about the link between asthma and other respiratory diseases and what researchers hope to discover about its link to COVID-19. This content originated with a UArizona Health Sciences news release.
Healio ►►►

Monday, November 29, 2021

EMPULSE Results ‘Important’ For Heart Failure Practitioners
Nancy K. Sweitzer, MD, PhD
, director of the UArizona Sarver Heart Center, discusses results from the EMPULSE trial presented at this year’s American Heart Association Scientific Sessions.
Healio ►►►

Friday, July 16, 2021

National ‘All of Us’ COVID-19 Genetics Study Happening at Banner-UMC
The All of Us Research Program, a national study on how diseases affect us based on our own genetics, is helping healthcare professionals learn more about COVID-19. Renowned College of Medicine – Tucson adult asthma physician-scientist and Department of Medicine chair Monica Kraft, MD, the principal investigator, is quoted.
KVOA News4 Tucson ►►►

Tuesday, April 13, 2021

Ernest Vina, MD, on Patient Perceptions of NSAID Use for Osteoarthritis
A UArizona-led study uncovers several factors linked with higher rates of use of prescription and OTC anti-inflammatories with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs. Ernest Vina, MD, a College of Medicine – Tucson rheumatologist and researcher, served as the study's first author...
Medpage Today ►►►

Thursday, April 8, 2021

University of Arizona Studies if Vaccinated People Can Spread Coronavirus
Researchers at the UArizona Health Sciences are trying to find out if vaccinated people can spread the coronavirus. The study, called PreventCOVIDU, is enlisting 12,000 students from more than 20 universities across the country to determine if fully vaccinated people need to continue wearing masks or social distancing. Elizabeth Connick, MD, chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases at the UArizona College of Medicine – Tucson, is leading the research site....
KOLD News13 TV Tucson ►►►

Friday, December 4, 2020

New Leadership for UArizona/Banner All of Us Research Program
The University of Arizona College of Medicine named Monica Kraft, MD, the new contact principal investigator for the UArizona’s Banner Health All of Us Research Program...
Inside Tucson Business ►►►

Thursday, December 3, 2020

Best Lip Balms 2020
If you’re leaving home often, look for a lip balm with some sun protection (SPF 15 if you won’t be outside for long; SPF 30 if you’re headed to the beach). Lisa Quale, senior health educator at the Skin Cancer Institute at the University of Arizona Cancer Center reminds readers to reapply often when you’re outside because sunscreen wears off very quickly from the lips.
New York Times ►►► 

Wednesday, December 2, 2020

Better Sleep Health May Help People Quit Smoking
New research from the University of Arizona Health Sciences led by Michael Grandner, MD, and Elizabeth Connick, MD, chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, shows getting a good night’s sleep could be another tool to help people successfully quit smoking.
Sleep Review ►►►

Friday, November 27, 2020

UArizona Tracking COVID's Long Term EffectsB
Christian Bime, MD, an assistant professor in the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson's Department of Medicine, is interviewed about his research into the long-term effects of COVID-19.
KGUN9-TV Tucson ►►►

Wednesday, November 25, 2020

Promoting Health and Well-Being During the Coronavirus Pandemic
As European countries go into lockdown again amid a cold, dark winter, people will be spending even more time indoors. Small changes in your home can make you mentally healthier. People always reference nature when asked what their favorite visual scene is, according to Esther Sternberg, MD, research director at the University of Arizona Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine in Tucson, Arizona. 
DW (Germany) ►►►

Tuesday, November 24, 2020

Man Shares Battle Against Pancreatic Cancer
Nurses Mike and Missy Skaggs share their battle against pancreatic cancer after Mike was diagnosed with the disease at 47. Rachna Shroff, MD, associate professor of medicine in the Division of Hematology and Oncology and chief of GI Medical Oncology at the University of Arizona Cancer Center, explains the disease is difficult to treat because there is no preventative screening to detect pancreatic cancer.
Today with Hoda & Jenna (NBC) ►►►

Monday, November 23, 2020

Study: Delay Lab Tests in Low-Risk HIV Patients to Minimize COVID-19 Exposure
In the era of the COVID-19 pandemic, physicians have had to reconsider how and for whom testing is done, particularly in people living with HIV who, as a result of a myriad of risk factors, may be predisposed to having severe disease should they acquire COVID-19, said Lawrence D. York, PharmD, from the University of Arizona Petersen HIV Clinics at the UArizona Health Sciences, said during a virtual poster presentation at IDWeek.
Healio ►►►

Thursday, November 19, 2020

Knocking Down the COVID-19 Disparities Through University Community Partnerships
Continuing coverage: Dr. Sairam Parthasarathy, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine in the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson, was recently named one of 11 lead investigators for the National Institutes of Health Community Engagement Alliance Against COVID-19 Disparities, also known as the CEAL program, to identify and combat COVID-19-related health disparities. Related content.
Arizona Daily Wildcat ►►► 

Monday, March 2, 2020

Race May Influence Transplant Decision Making in Heart Failure
Studies also detail Disparities in hypertension diagnosis, statin prescribing...
Circulation: Heart Failure Journal ►►►

Friday, Dec. 6, 2019

Study: Getting a good night's rest is important for better bone health
University of Arizona Cancer Center researchers participate in study with University of Buffalo which was just published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research...
UB News Center ►►►

Thursday, Nov. 14, 2019

Need to Know: 21st-century Medicine Models
UArizona Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine...
MS News Today ►►►

Wednesday, November 13, 2019

Business awards earned in Southern Arizona
Banner–University Medical Center Tucson has earned comprehensive stroke certification from The Joint Commission...
Arizona Daily Star ►►► | PDF

Why Does Arizona Have Such a Doctor Shortage?
University of Arizona's medical college in Phoenix is increasing its enrolling class size to 100 students, up from 80. Even with the increased class size, Arizona will have a significant need for more doctors...
KPNX-TV Phoenix ►►►
Associated Press ►►►
KGUN9-TV Tucson ►►►
KPHO-TV Phoenix ►►►
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KTVK-Phoenix ►►►
U.S. News & World Report ►►►
Arizona Republic ►►►
KYMA (NBC) Yuma ►►►
Flinn Foundation ►►►

Follicular Lymphoma: Recent and Emerging Therapies, Treatment Strategies, and Remaining Unmet Needs
Daniel Persky, MD, University of Arizona Cancer Center...
The Oncologist ►►►

Arizona, California account for most valley fever cases
John Galgiani, MD, director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the University of Arizona...
Ahwatukee Foothills News ►►►

UA unveils Health Sciences Innovation Building
An open house was celebrated for the UArizona Health Sciences Innovation Building that included tours as well as a two-day series of lectures, the Cancer Prevention Public Forum, that included Clara Curiel-Lewandrowski, MD, and Juanita Merchant, MD, PhD...
Northwest Explorer ►►► | PDF